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Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Transformation Tuesday- Part 7 of Health Challenge



I am half way through the health challenge sponsored by Dr. Jay Davidson of Max Health Chiropractic.

If you want to go through the challenge yourself you can do so by signing up through their web site.
http://www.maxhealthchiro.com/

You will get a challenge each day for 14 days. I think it is a bit much to do a challenge every day so I've been doing one a week and summarizing it here.

Part 7 was a review of some of the action steps discussed so far in the challenge:


  1. Drink lemon weater ( 1 liter of water with juice of 1/2 lemon)
  2. Oil pulling- look it up on Web MD.  This should be done after the lemon water. I have not tried this yet, maybe some day.
  3. Find a health provider you trust to provide coaching on your health, nutrition, exercise and supplementation.
  4. Attend seminars about health, medical issues, exercise and nutrition. Seminars can deliver a lot of information in a short amount of time.
  5. Review the goals set in part one for your health for the next 3 weeks, 3 months and 3 years.
  6. Review your "Big Why"  This why is the reason you set health goals and work to maintain your health. When things get tough remember why you are doing all this.
  7. Watch your sugar intake and begin to reduce it.
  8. Replace the sugar and grain in your diet with healthier options.
It make take getting out of your comfort zone to make some of these happen, but that is where real change takes place.

*************************



Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Monday, April 27, 2015

Week 1- World Championship Training-Transitions



First event for Team CMT April 2011, Brown Deer, Wisconsin

Week 1 Training
Monday         Swim 70 minutes
Tuesday         Yoga 60 minutes, run 30 minutes
Wednesday     Bike class 90 minutes
Thursday         Swim 55 minutes, run 50 minutes
Friday              Rest day
Saturday          Bike 45 minutes
Sunday            Jayhawk tri (500 meter swim, 13.8 mile bike, 5 K trail run)  1st place female 55-59

Talent is cheaper than table salt. What separates the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work.” – Stephen King
For the last 4 years, I transitioned into triathlon season after running a spring marathon. I ran the Boston Marathon the last 3 years. With a million spectators on the course it was a great way to raise awareness of CMT. Last year fellow team member CJ Charboneau also partricpated in the Boston marathon.  We've had three other team members that have had qualifying times to run Boston. That is a great accomplishment considering patients with CMT were once told not to exercise.
I have lots of great memories of Boston, but unlike many long distance runners I knew I would not be able to go back year after year. Both of my coaches have asked me to stop running long distance. My plan even before running my first Boston was to transition into triathlons. That transition is now complete. I participate in many more triathlons then running events now.   At least for the near future my running will be short distance.  But I am a long distance runner at heart, so I guess we will see what the future holds.  It is difficult to plan too far out in the future when you have CMT, because there are no guarentees about how it will progress.
The Boston Marathon was on Monday so I now consider myself once again in serious training.
I had some news that makes my transition into triathlon a really good idea. I've had problems with my right ankle since training for Boston last year. The ankle swelled up after a track workout and I have been sporting two golf ball size pockets of fluid on the top of the ankle since last June.
A visit to an ortho doctor this week had good news and bad news. The fluid can be drained but it would cause more damage than good and would probably come back.  The fluid is due to arthritis damage in the ankle, so even surgery may not fix the problem.
The good news is I was not told to stop running and that I can probably keep running for some time to come. But no track workouts since they stress my ankle.  To minimize the damage on the ankle keeping to triathlons is probably a good idea for now.
It was a week of doctor visits. First to my neurologist and then to an audiologist. I've had ringing in my ears and I've now found out I have some significant hearing loss. I might benefit from hearing aids, but I cannot bring myself to wear them just yet. I'm told by the next time I have my hearing test in two years, I won't have a choice.
This week will mark the 4 year anniversary of Team CMT.   On April 30, 2011 Cheryl and Robert Kearney and myself did the 10K Deer Run in Brown Deer, Wisconsin. From those simple beginning we've grown to 163 members in 32 states and 6 countries.  We even inspired the  CMTA and the MDA to start teams.  On most weekends we have a Team CMT member somewhere doing an event wearing our Team CMT kit.  We do events from local races to National and World Champsionships. I will be competing in the ITU World Championship in Chicago in September for Aquathlon and Triathlon.

I   qualified as an age group athlete. I didn't volunteer or ask to be put on a start list. I earned it at a National Championship race. I will be representing Team USA in my aquathlon race and Team CMT in my triathlon race.


So I have lots of work ahead of me. I know one thing, I may not be the most talented athlete, but no one can out work me.  My biggest challenge will be staying healthy.
I finished off my first week of training with the Jayhawk Triathlon in Whitewater Wisconsin. It seemed like a good race to tune up for Paratriathon National Championships in Austin  at the end of May.
The race started with a pool swim,  My last tri, I got lapped in the pool by the eventual women's winner. This time I lapped the swimmer sharing my lane.  Since I was the only women in my age group, I decided to spend the time to change into dry clothes before heading out into the 40 degree weather.  My swim was 10:48 and I added almost as much time to change clothes.
Off on the bike course. It was hilly and windy. I was bundled up in sweats and a long sleeve shirt and windbreaker over my tri suit.  My feet were both a little numb when I got off the bike. I was able to average 15.3 mph. Not great, but OK for a windy and hilly course.
The run was all on trails. That is a huge challenge for someone with CMT. There were roots and rocks, soft spots and some big hills. You just cannot go as fast on a trail as a road course. My time was much slower than usual, but I finished safely.
I finished first in my age group, but I was the only one so it was not too much of a victory. Still my time was comparable with the age group above and below me. It was just the tune up I needed as I get ready for Austin and tranisiton into my most important races this season.


****************

Wodke Competing for Team USA PATCO 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing



Sunday, April 26, 2015

Soup Sunday- Lime Chicken Soup

Soup weather returned to Milwaukee this week. We hardly saw the sun the last two weeks. It's rained almost every day with temperatures in the 40's.  That is pretty typical spring weather here. It may not get warm until late in May. In the mean time that means a chance to try out another soup recipe. Hope you like this weeks additions.

Lime Chicken Soup
Lime Chicken Soup

4 chicken thighs, roasted and shredded
1 stalk diced green onions
1 cup diced celery
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon minced garlic
3 cups tomato juice
3 cups chicken broth
1 can (28 ounce) can diced tomatoes in juice
1 can (4.5 ounces) diced green chilies
½ cup lime juice
1 cup frozen corn kernels
1 cup cooked rice
1 can chili beans drained and rinsed.
½ cup chopped fresh cilantro


Sauté celery, onion and garlic in the olive oil. Cook for 3-5 minutes until soft.  Add the tomato juice, broth, tomatoes and green chilies.  Cook over low heat until just below a boil. Add the chicken, corn kernels, rice, and chili beans.  Cook until heated through. Add the cilantro.  Serve with chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

********

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Saturday, April 25, 2015

Superfood Saturday- Blueberry Haze Juice

Blueberry Haze
I started juicing this winter. I would make a different juice each Saturday to take with me when I did my ski patrol shift.  Because I had my juice I wasn't tempted to drink soda during our potluck dinners. I've given up soda, the chemicals and sugar are something I don't want in my diet.  So I've substituted these juices.



2 apples
1 ½ cups blueberries
½ grapefruit
1 inch fresh ginger peeled.

Place all the items in the jucier.

Sunset Berry

1 cup strawberries, hulled
1 orange peeled
½ lime peeled


Juice and stir.

Superfoods: Blueberries, grapefruit

***********************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Monday, April 20, 2015

Meb Moments


Mike Cassidy and Meb Keflezighi at finish of 2013 New York Marathon

"But I also realize that winning doesn't always mean getting 1st place;It means getting the best out of yourself." - Meb Keflezighi


Today Meb further cemented his rock start status with another finish line gesture at today's Boston Marathon.

Meb had been in contention through much of the race. I tracked him on line and when I saw the 1 hr 4 min split at the half way mark I knew it was probably too fast for Meb. He was in it almost to the end when a hamstring injury left him in 8th place.

As he approached the finish line he spotted American elite runner Hilary Dionne about to finish her race. He sprinted to catch her and as they crossed the finish line they raised their arms in triumph.

Meb explained that his gesture was what the running community is all about- to lift one another up.

He said " We start together, for 26.2 miles and we struggle.

Dione said she struggled the whole race and that the gesture made the challenge all worth it.

Meb had just left the finish line area when the bombs exploded in 2013. He vowed to come back to win the race and wrote the names of those killed in the bombing on his race number.

I remember I was on mile 8 last year when I heard a murmur in the crowd and we found out Meb had won last year's Boston Marathon. He showed us all how to take back the marathon for the people of Boston.

Today was not his only finish line gesture. The 2013 New York Marathon had a finish line Meb moment as well.

Mike Cassidy, a 2012 Olympic Trials qualifier was struggling in the New York Marathon. It was not the great race he planned.  Depute having a tough day he decided to keep going.

At mile 23 he realized he had caught up to his idol Meb Kefezighi.  Cassidy said: "Let's go Meb."
They ran together the final three miles, changing places to share the work.

Cassidy said it was like playing basketball with Michael Jordan in game 7 of the NBA finals.

As they entered the final stretch in Central Park, Cassidy turned to Meb as they entered the park and said; "It's been an honor to run with you."

Meb turned to him and said; " No, today is not about us, It's about representing New York. It's about representing Boston. It's about representing the USA and doing something positive for our sport. We will finish this race holding hands."

The pair crossed the finish line together, hands held high, just like today.

What great finishes and what a great man. Meb embodies the spirit of the running community.

I had a similar moment in my 4th marathon here in Milwaukee. It was one of those days every runner has if they run long enough. I was struggling from start to finish.  I wanted to quit.  I talked myself into going to at least 20 miles I figure if I can get that far I can finish.

At the 20 mile mark I met Jim. He was struggling too and we made a pact to get each other to the finish line. We walked and talked and ran. As we finished I grabbed his hand and we crossed together hands held high. I've always remembered that moment.

Everyone has hard days, everyone has challenges. Many of us carry private burdens. We can all be there for each other to inspire and uplift. Meb and Mike Cassidy lifted each other up that day. Today and in New York Meb lifted us all up.

Cassidy said that day in New York he learned from Meb never to quit.  Today we learned another lesson about being a positive influence and being a great representative for an entire community.

Meb did not cross the finish line first today, yet he gave all of us the very best of himself.  Meb, you will always be a winner to me.

**********************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Sunday, April 19, 2015

Salad Sunday- Guacamole Quinoa Salad


The weather is finally turning warmer here in the midwest. Since the weather is nicer, I crave soup less and salads more. It's time to try some new salad recipes. Today I have one that could easily have made my Super Food Saturday blog.

This salad has a number of super foods in its ingredients.  Quinoa is a good meat substitute since it is the only plant based source with complete protein.  Quinoa is easy to cook. I put a cup of raw quinoa into a well oiled rice cooker with 2 cups of water. Then I turn on the cooker and let it run until all the water is absorbed. this will yield two cups of cooked quinoa.

Jicama is a root common in Latin American cooking. It takes like a water chestnute and is high in nuturtion. It makes a nice crunchy addition to the salad.

Guacamole Quinoa Salad


1 large avocado, pitted, peeled and mashed
juice of 1 lime
2 cups cooked quinoa
1 bunch green onions
½ large jicama
½ mango, diced
½ jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely chopped
1 cup grape tomatoes, halved
½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 teaspoon chili powder

In a medium bowl mix the mashed avocado and lime juice.  Add the remaining ingredients to combine. Serve chilled.


4 servings


***********************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Superfood Saturday- Maple Ricotta Smoothie


The weekends are usually when I make smoothies.  I'm at work most days at 6:30 so I don't have time to make breakfast at homes. So when I have time I weekends I like to try different smoothie and juice recipes.  So here is this weeks entry.



1 cup unsweetened almond milk
½ cup ricotta cheese
1 ripe pear
1 tablespoons ground flax seed
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger

The ricotta cheese adds protein to the smoothie. The flax seed in rich in omega 3 and anti oxidants.  The protein makes this a great recovery drink after a workout.  The cinnamon and ginger have been shown to help burn fat

Super Foods Featured:  Ginger, Cinnamon, Almond milk, flax seed

************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Thoughts on Boston, A little Perspective

My guide Cheryl Kearney and me just shortly before we heard about the bombings


One equal temper of heroic hearts
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek to find, and not to yield
.” – Tennyson’s Ulysses

These words are inscribed on  the Boston Marathon Monument dedicated in Copley Square in Boston in 1996.  Two years ago yesterday I was on the course when the finish line was bombed.  I’ve been thinking a lot about Boston this week and the three times I ran the race. I recently had a chance to relive the events of the 2013 race.

A couple of weeks ago, I volunteered to work pack-up pick up at the South Shore Half Marathon in Milwaukee. The race is sponsored by my running club the Badgerland Striders. As a member I’m supposed to volunteer for at least one race every season. I pick this one because it is close to home and lots of my friends participate in the race. I ran it last year as I got ready to run the Boston Marathon.

I always volunteer for packet pickup because it is inside, an advantage in our cool springs in Wisconsin and I am finished early freeing up the rest of the day for my own workout. 
Because it was a running event I wore my Boston jacket. I don’t wear it except to an occasional running event. It’s a little bit of chance to show off.  I was working at the pick-up table right next to a women about my age, wearing the same turquoise and yellow jacket I had on, the one from 2013, the year of the bombing.

So of course we starting talking about the same thing every runner that was there that day talks about. I asked her where she was when the bombs went off.  She was a half mile out; I was on mile 23 when my guide got the first text messages on her phone.

She proceeded to tell me what a terrible experience she had that day because she was not able to get her checked luggage with her cell phone. She needed the phone to contact her friend she was staying with for pick up.  She got a police officer to text her friend on his cell and bought something to eat with the $5 she had on her.

She made is sound like it was a traumatic experiences When I listened to her whole story and timeline. It seemed like her pick up was only delayed by about 90 minutes. Hundreds of runners were not allowed to access their hotels because the area around the finish was a crime scene. So it seems like she got off really easy.  I was telling her how I spent a couple of hours texting and putting up dates on social media that I was ok. Of course she had to top that by saying she was doing it for hours and hours.

She also started ranting about how arrogant the Boston Athletic Association, the organization that runs the race is because they made her pay to come back in 2014 and run. I had a completely different view.  Like her I was one of the 6000 runners that did not finish. I was grateful the B.A.A. invited us back and gave us a finisher medal. I shared with her, the B.A.A has to pay the towns the race passes through and it took months to negotiate payment and agree to numbers allowed in the race. She thought anyone that qualifies should be able to run the Boston Marathon. She was angry there are any limits on the race.

We had completely different perspectives. I looked at the B.A.A as an organization that allowed me to compete as a runner and showed nothing but concern for my safety. The bombing was not their fault but they acted like a first class organization in working to accommodate those that did not get to cross the finish line that day. Finishing was the last thing I think about. I still think about every one that was injured and killed that day. I remember hearing sirens conveying victims to the hospital next to my hotel until 9 pm that night.

She thought about the event only from her perspective. I thought of everything I saw and heard that day and in the days after. I heard how hundreds of Boston residents opened their homes to runners locked out of their hotel room.  I was touched and humbled by the scores of people that reached out to make sure I was ok.  She chose to make herself unhappy with her negative experience and criticism.
 I think of those injured and the stories I saw of how hard many of them fought to get their lives back.
I remember people thanking me for coming back last year and the city needed us to run the race. They needed us to be part of the healing process for them.

 I remember being treated like a rock star by the fans along the route every year I ran the event. Together the fans and the runners took back the race.  The bombing was evil, but I saw so much good on display every time I went to Boston.  The people of Boston and in the communities along the marathon route showed us what is meant to be Boston Strong. I continue to be inspired by their grace and resilience.

I look at the three years I ran Boston as the three greatest years of my athletic life. Maybe because I worked so hard to get there I appreciated the experience more.  Maybe because I never expected to run the Boston Marathon I cherished every moment. Maybe my perspective was different because I didn’t just focus on how I was affected.

 I choose to view my CMT the same way. Instead of focusing on what I’ve lost and what I continue to lose, I focus on how I can still swim, bike and run. Many days CMT really sucks, but it isn’t cancer, it isn’t ALS.  I could make myself miserable by being sad or angry about something I can’t change, or I can do the best I can within my circumstances.

Maybe just a little change in perspective makes all the difference.

******************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Transformation Tuesday- Week 6 Health Challenge Super Sugars



I am continuing this week with a summary of the Health Challenge from Davidson Chiropractic here in Wisconsin.

Just a disclaimer at the start. The information presented is not meant as medical advise and is presented as part of the series by Dr. Jay Davidson. It is in no way an endorsement by me. Seek medical advise before changing your diet.

The information in toady's article is similar to what is presented in the book "Wheat Belly" by Dr. William Davis.

Sugar can cause inflammation in our bodies and lead to conditions like cancer, diabetes, pain, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, ADHD and other inflammatory conditions.

The thinking is sugar (Glucose, Sucrose, Fructose, Lactose) can come from multiple sources such as:

  • Maple Sugar
  • Maple Syrup
  • Sugar Cane
  • Cane Juices
  • Corn and corn derivatives
  • Corn syrup
  • High Fructose Corn Syrup
  • Corn Oil
  • Corn Meal
  • Dextrose
  • MSG
  • Xanthan Gum
Grains are also considered a sugar since they quickly change to sugar in your mouth ( in about 4 seconds). Grains considered sugars include:
  • Wheat
  • Rice (white and brown)
  • Oats
  • Barley
Sugar can cause a roller coaster effect on your blood sugar, making you feel more hungry later in the day.  

We consume too much sugar; as much as 150 lbs per year of sugar and 79 lbs of high fructose corn syrup.

Davidson Chiropractic is a Maximized Living Office and they recommend following the diet plan in the book " Maximized Living Nutrition Plans" by Dr. B.J. Hardick, Kimberly Roberto and Dr. Ben Lerner.  Both this book and the Wheat Belly book are available on Amazon.com

Sugar causes inflammation and creates an environment for disease to thrive. So they suggest completely getting rid of sugar for 14 days. Once this is done, it is claimed your body will now start to burn fat instead of sugar.  The book has suggestions for replacing bread and pasta in your diet.  

For instance instead of eating a sandwhich you use a lettuce wrap and you can replace pasta with spaghetti squash.

I am not sure I absolutely buy this approach.  I have however over the last two years greatly cut back on the sugar and grain I consume. I replace breakfast most days with a smoothie or Greek Yogurt and fruit. I 've replaced my sandwich at lunch with soup.   I did this because I saw these foods as being more nutrient dense.

If I had pain every day had cancer or some chronic condition like diabetes, then maybe eliminating all sugars and the sugar grains from my diet would make sense. Right now I am taking a more moderate approach by reducing pasta, grains and sugars. It seem to be working. You have to figure out what works best for you.

Think about signing up for the 14 part health challenge by Max Health Chiropractic at  http://www.maxhealthchiro.com/

If you do you can learn the 10 children's cereals with the most sugar and then you can make your own decision about sugar and grains in your diet.

*******************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Monday, April 13, 2015

A Positive Influence

Team CMT at Bike New York


Example is not the main thing in influencing others….it is the only thing.” Albert Schweitzer
I recently started reading a book by John C. Maxwell called "The Daily Reader".  He has a small inspirational piece for each day of the year.
Recently he quoted the statistic that sociologists say even an introverted person will influence ten thousand other people during their lifetime.  That's good news for me since I'm a classic introvert.
Every day we are being influenced by and influencing others.  All of both follow and lead.
When you think about it each of has an enormous potential to make a difference.  Every day you have to decide if you will be a positive influence on those around your or a negative one.
When I was diagnosed with CMT, I made the decision from day one not to let my CMT stand in the way of my living a full life. I realized what a gift it was to have a diagnosis. I realized I was lucky to still be so active.
I chose to focus on what ability I had left and not on what I'd lost to CMT.  I decided to use my ability to run to raise awareness of CMT.  I wanted to show others that while we may have CMT it does not have us.
I also founded Team CMT because I know what power there is in numbers. I am so proud to have 160 other members on this team in 32 states and 6 countries.  We have many members affected by CMT that run, walk, swim and bike to raise awareness.  When I see pictures of our members from events, their smiles inspire me. They influence me to keep going.  They make me proud to be a part of this team.
I've seen the effect this team has had on the CMT community.  We've raised thousands for CMT research, but more importantly we've changed the conversation in the CMT community.  I used to see discussion on Facebook about exercise being harmful to those with CMT. Now I see conversations about the exercise people are doing or questions about the type of exercise that can be done.  
Not long ago, people kept there CMT a secret. I hope Team CMT members example have given courage to others to be open about their CMT. We have nothing to be ashamed about.  We did nothing to get CMT. It is just one of the many genetic gifts we got from our parents.
We even have our imitators, both the CMTA and the MDA have started sports teams. So our influence has reached to all three organizations serving CMT patients.
I hope the entire CMT community will continue to benefit from the positive experience of Team CMT. I am so proud of all of them.

******************
Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 160 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing