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Monday, May 18, 2015

World Championship Training Week 4- Bouncing Back

Transition Clinic with P3 Training Group, Menomonee Falls Wisconsin

You have to have your heart broken, before you can become a champion.”  Doug Collins, Pro basketball player and coach.

5/11     Monday          Swim 40 minutes, weights 30 minutes
5/12     Tuesday          Transition Clinic, 2 hours
5/13     Wednesday     Off day
5/14     Thursday         Run 20 minutes, bike  1 hour 20 minutes
5/15     Friday              Run 60  minutes, intervals
5/16     Saturday          Swim 60 minutes, weights 30 minutes
5/17     Sunday            Chocolate City Bike Ride, 2 hours
I have my first outdoor triathlon of the season on Memorial Day. I've already done two indoor triathlons finishing first in both of them.
This one is a bigger test because I will be racing in the PC Open division of the National Paratriathlon Championship in Austin, Texas. I've had my heart broken more than once in Austin. I'd hope to be classified for one of the paratriathlon categories. I need to be medically classified into one of categories to be eligible for the U.S. Team and ITU World Championships.
I was told the first year I was not impaired enough. That was tough to hear, but I was promised the assessment process would change in 2014 in preparation for the paralympic games in 2016.  
They did change and the neuromuscular category was combined with single leg amputees.  That made it impossible for anyone with CMT to compete and be successful.   Last year in Chicago I failed assessment with ITU, meaning I could not even be assessed in Austin. So I will watch others line up to compete for spots on the US team and a trip to the World Championships in Chicago. That race will be the qualifier for Rio.
So while I'm not able to qualify for a World Championship as a paratriathlete, I will be going as an age group athlete.  I keep working out with the hope that one day soon I will go to a classification assessment and be accepted to compete.
I keep showing up to make a case for great acceptance for those of us with CMT. Those like myself that can make the time standard to complete, cannot pass the medical classification. So far those that have made it through classification are not fast enough to qualify for the National Championship. In my category I need a sprint triathlon time of 1 hour 46. That qualification time used to be 2 hours and 30 minutes. The new time leaves out many athletes with CMT.
So in the mean time I have an age group World Championship race to get ready for.  That means lots of workout and lots of practice.
This week that practice was a triathlon clinic run by my coach Heather Haviland. Heather is a former pro triathlete. She gave us some great tips on setting up a transition area.  Then it was our chance to do three circuits of a run, a transition, a bike and back into transition.
My skills are a little rusty. My fingers always struggle to get my bike helmet on. With the practice I got, hopefully race day will go smoothly. 
I've finished in the top three at Nationals the last three years and I'll do my best this year as well.
It wasn't all work this week. I got to do the Chocolate City ride in Burlington, Wisconsin.  Burlington is home to a Nestle factory, hence the Chocolate City nickname. I got to raise a little awareness of CMT.


I stopped to take a picture and a family stopped at the same place. They asked about my Team CMT uniform. It is great how many times I'm asked about Team CMT when I do events. I always use it as a chance to raise awareness of CMT.
The ride rest stops were stocked with chocolate. It was a hilly course with great Wisconsin scenery.
Burlington is farm country and I passed several really beautiful barns. I swear if I ever win the lottery, I'm going to start a non profit to preserve old farm barns. Most of them are from the late 19th century or early 20th century.  I grew up around farms and loved seeing this bit of rural Wisconsin.
This week will be packing and trip preps and of course a few workouts to be ready for Austin.
************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Boston Marathon Bomber Sentence-No Comment

Boston Marathon, shortly before we heard about the finish line bombings

Every failure, every adversity, every heartache, comes with it the seed of an equal or greater benefit.”  Napoleon Hill

I had the radio on for my commute home on Friday afternoon. It was there that I heard Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsahaev had been sentenced to death for his part in the bombing.

A local TV anchor had left me a voice mail and a facebook message asking me to call him. Connecting the dots I'm guessing he wanted me to comment on the verdict.

I'd done quite a bit of media both when the bombing occurred and when I went back to run the race last year.

I messaged back to say I did not feel right about making a comment.  Comments belong to the members of the jury or even those affected. I was neither one of those.

I was on mile 23 when my guide got the first text on her cell phone alerting us to the bombing.  I was never in any danger.  I did not get to finish my race, really minor in the whole scheme of what happened that day.

 I did a radio interview the evening of the bombing and another while waiting for my flight. Reporters were waiting when I got off my flight in Milwaukee. I was happy to talk about what it was like to be in the city and my experiences along the course. I felt deeply for those affected and for the wonderful people in the towns all along the course that had come out to cheer for me. They treated my like a rock star and I was touched by it.

It did not seem right this time to do an interview. Three people lost their lives at the finish line and another later in the week on the MIT campus in Cambridge. I did not know any of them.  Over 200 spectators were injured at the finish line, 41 of them lost limbs. Who was I to comment about a just punishment for an incident that did not harm me?

I think about how this young bomber has wasted his life. He was in college and should have had a bright future. I wonder what could make someone go so wrong that he would set down a bomb behind 8 year old Martin Richard and kill him.  I do not understand how someone whose family we took into this country as refugees and who we supported financially could do this.

I do not disagree with the decision to execute, but it is not for me to comment if it will bring closure to the family members of those killed or if it will provide healing to those injured.  I have no right to an opinion.

Ask the people of Boston, ask those injured or those that lost someone.    I will always remember the incredible fans along the course in the three Boston Marathons I've run. They loved me as a runner.  The people of Boston opened their homes to runners locked out of their hotels, because they were at the crime scene.  Everyone killed or injured was a spectator that day. Just there to cheer us on as we full filled our Boston Marathon dreams.

Ask one of the church ladies that knit over 10,000 scarves to give to runners that returned to run in 2014. Each one included a blessing and a prayer for the runner. As it was placed on my neck, I was told I was being wrapped in courage and love.  Ask them how they can be so loving and positive in the face of such evil.

The people of Boston showed us the meaning of Boston Strong.  They could have stayed home out of fear, but they turned out over one million strong along the course last year. Together we showed the world that we will not live our lives in fear.   We took back the marathon. Ask them what they think about the verdict.

Because for me, my response will be no comment.

*************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Monday, May 11, 2015

World Championship Training- Week 3, Balance

A little bit of my garden


"I've never known a man worth his salt who in the long run deep down in his heart, didn't appreciate the grind, the disciplinee." - Vince Lombardi


Monday                  2 hour group bike ride with Bella Donna bike club
Tuesday                  Yoga for cyclist, 60 minutes
Wednesday             Wts. 30 minutes, run 55 minutes, swim 70 minutes
Thursday                 Bike 1 hr 20 minutes, run 22 minutes
Friday                      Run 1 hr 20 minutes
Saturday                   Bike 2 hr 30 minutes, swim 60 min, wts. 30 minutes
Sunday                     Walk 30 minutes

Most days I like training and don't see it as a grind. It gets a little old in the winter, but now that the weather is nice at least on some days, I can get outside to bike and run. Swimming outside is still a few weeks away. Really only about 3 weeks. When I get back from para-triathlon Nationals in Austin, lake swimming will have started and the outdoor pools will be open. There is nothing better than swimming laps in the summer outside.

The weather has been really up and down. Some days last week it was in the 80's and sunny, but by the weekend it was rainy and in the 40's. So some days this week I had the freedom of outside workouts, other days it was the grind of being indoors.

The biggest challenge for me is balancing everything I have going on in my life while training in three sports.  The CMT also complicates things because I have to be careful not to overdue. It can be a real balancing act to get my training in,work, run errands, clean the house and do some writing.

Now that the weather is warmer, I can add gardening to the list.  I have a flower garden that surrounds my entire house and goes around my entire backyard.   Spring in the garden means lots of clean up of dead leaves and winter debris.

I have to make sure I don't work in the garden or more than a couple of hours or I really pay for it at night.  Almost no workout makes me as sore as working in the garden. If I overdue it can feel like my whole body is on fire.

So I am working my way around the garden a few hours at a time, at least when it's warm and sunny.  I really love it. It is such a treat to see flowers and green grass after a long mid-western winter.
When I see how pretty my garden looks, all the hard work is worth it. Just like when I cross the finish line in a race, all the hard workouts are worth it.

Balance is the key. Finding the right balance of working out to be successful, but now so much that I over do it.  Sometimes all my carefully laid plans get upset. On Friday I was scheduled for an MRI. My neurologist has some concerns from my yearly checkup.

What I thought would be a quick 20 minute scan was really supposed to be a 90 minute test.
As they were putting me into that very narrow opening, I decided 90 minutes in that confined space was really not going to work.  So not only did I miss my pool workout that night I had to rearrange my workouts all weekend. I still have to go through the test yet at some point and wait in suspense for the results.  All part of the balancing act of being an athlete.

*******************
Author at Aquathlon National Championship 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Sunday, May 10, 2015

Skillet Sunday- Supper Egg Bake



Today's recipe is not super healthy. It is simple and quick to make and is comfort food.
Hope you enjoy it.

8 ounces of fettuccine cooked and drained
¼ lb bacon, cooked crisp and drained
5 eggs beaten
¼ cup half and half
2 tablespoons butter
2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped
¾ cup shredded Mexican cheese blend

Break the bacon into small pieces.  Set the oven to 350 F.
Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet.  Mix in the fettuccine and stir until well coated with butter. Add the bacon and tomatoes.  Mix well.   Arrange the pasta so there are six nest like depressions.   Add eggs and cream to a bowl. Add the cheese. Mix well.
Pour the egg mixture into the depressions. It is OK if it runs into the rest of the mixture.
Put into the oven and bake for 25 minutes.


Makes 6 servings

*****************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Saturday, May 9, 2015

Superfood Saturday-Marathon Bars

I like bars for breakfast, but many of the commerial ones are not all that healthy.  This recipe is loaded with superfoods. You can eat these for breakfast. You can also freeze them like I did and take one out for pre-workout nutrition.

Marathon Bars *


½ cup steel cut oats
½ cup dried apricots
½ cup dried tart cherries
½ cup dried goji berries
½ cup shredded coconut
½ cup shelled hemp seeds
½ cup almonds chopped
¼ cup non fat dry milk powder
½ cup toasted wheat germ
½ cup coco nibs
¼ cup agave syrup
¼ cup honey
½ cup almond or cashew butter
1 teaspoon orange extract/

Combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl. Coat a  9 inch baking pan with cooking spray. Press ingredients into the pan.  Cover the top with plastic wrap and press down with your hands. Remove plastic wrap. Place in oven 1t 300 F for 45 minutes. Cover and cool in the refrigerator.  Cut into 1 x 2 inch bars.  Wrap each in foil and store for up to 4 weeks in the refrigerator.


* Adapted from Runner’s World Magazine

Superfoods Featured: oats, tart cherries, Gogi berries, hemp seeds, almonds, almond butter

*********************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Friday, May 8, 2015

Fair Friday-Coconut Honey Lip Balm



I had time to try out a natural beauty product. Now that summer is here, I am busy with garden work, house projects, training and racing. So I won't get a chance to post every week. I try every recipe that I put on the blog. Today is another product you can make with ingredients you may have in your kitchen. I got the raw honey from Amazon. The vitamin E oil helps is an anti oxidant and helps to preserve the lip balm. The orange oil is optional. You could use  vanilla essential oil or extract.  I used the orange because it pairs well with the coconut and honey. It also has some skin healing properties.

Coconut Lip Balm

1/4 cup raw honey
1/4 cup organic coconut oil
1/8 teaspoon vitamin E oil
20 drops sweet orange essential oil

Place the honey and coconut oil in a glass jar. Place the jar in a saucepan of water. Heat until the mixture melts.  The coconut oil may float on the top.  Remove from heat and add the vitamin E and the orange oil. Pour into a glass jar.  Put in the refrigerator. Remove every few minutes and stir to mix.  Keep repeating the process until the mixture has cooled.

Apply to lips.

*************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathlon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Attitude- What's Your Choice?



Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space lies our freedom and power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and freedom.”- Viktor Frankl

Evey day I read an entry from a book called "The Daily Reader" by John C. Maxwell. Maxwell is an expert on leadership development and team building. One day last week he had this entry on attitude.


What is Attitude?

When you hear the word attitude, what do you think about? I think of attitude as an inward feeling expressed by outward behavior. People always project on the outside what they feel on the inside. Some people try to mask their attitude, and they can fool others for a while. But that cover-up doesn’t last long. Attitude always wiggles its way out.

Your attitude colors every aspect of your life. It is like the mind’s paintbrush. It can paint everything in bright, vibrant colors – creating a masterpiece. Or it can make everything dark and dreary. Attitude is so pervasive and important that I’ve come to think of it like this:


· It is the vanguard of your true self.

· It’s root is inward but its fruit is outward.

· It is your best friend or worst enemy.

· It is more honest and consistent about you than your words.

· It is your outward look based on your past experiences.

· It is what draws people to you or repels them.

· It is never content until it is expressed.

· It is the librarian of your past.

· It is the speaker of your present.

· It is the prophet of your future.

There is not a single part of your current life that is not affected by your attitude. Your future will definitely be influenced by the attitude you carry with you from today forward.


I recently had two experiences with attitude in the CMT community. Someone in one of the CMT Facebook groups posted a rant about how she was tired of being told to push through things and how she was tired of the "superheros" posting pictures and talking about their runs. She went on to rant some more about her CMT.


The other attitude instance was posted by one of our Team CMT members. Her daughter who has CMT and is a high school student works as a cashier at a local grocery store. Her mom posted a compliment letter that a customer wrote to the store manager. The customer chose to get into her check out line because she was smiling and because she so obviously enjoyed what she was doing.


Each of these women made a choice, one to vent and play the victim. She concentrated on how miserable her life was and she was going to spoil someone else's day if you could.


The other also has CMT, but she has chosen to smile and do the best she can in spite of her CMT. She made the day better for someone else, by smiling and enjoying the moment.


The quote at the beginning of the article is by Viktor Frankel. He was a psycologist before the war. He was rounded up with other Jews and placed in a concentration camp. He said he learned from that experience that life did not owe him anything, but that life expected something out of him. That expectation that he had a purpose in his life helped him survive the concentration camp experience. Others with him survived because they found a reason to live, even if it was to bring justice to those that had imprisoned them.


They made a choice in even the most miserable of circumstances. Almost everyone has battles and burdens. Many fight secret battle we know nothing about. I find as bad as life can get, almost always someone I know is dealing with tougher issues.


So what will your choice be? Will you cry and whine and play the victim? Or will you be like my team member's daughter? Will you smile, find the joy in life and make life better for someone else?


Will you focus only inward and feel sorry for your self or will you realize life it isn't all about you?


It's your choice. Choose carefully. You just might make a difference in someones life or in your own.


*****************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Transformation Tuesday Week 8- A Good Nights Sleep



Sleep is important. Sleep is when the body repairs in\tself. Lack of sleep can create significant health issues, but many of us struggle to sleep.

I've been participating in a 14 part health challenge sponsored by Dr. Jay Davidson of Max Health Chiropractic here in Wisconsin.

This week one of the topics covered was tips to improve sleep. Here are just a few of the tips presented:

Early Bed Time
Get in bed and be ready to sleep before 11 pm. Every hour of sleep before midnight is worth two hours of sleep after.

Routine
Have a consistent routine to get ready for bed each night. The routine signals your mind and body it is time to wind down. This calms both body and mind.  Follow the same routine including bed time and wake up time on the weekends for best results.

Alcohol
A nightcap before bed may be traditional, but it interferes with sleep. Alcohol makes you sleepy, but it interrupts sleep and makes it harder to fall back asleep once awake.

Stimulants
Sugar and caffeine are stimulants. Avoid foods after lunch that contain them such as coffee, soda and chocolate.
TV and computer work can also be stimulants and should be avoided close to bed time.

Temperature
A cooler bedroom is helpful to sleep because it mimics the natural drop in body temperature that occurs when you sleep.  A hot bath 90 to 120 minutes for bed time also helps. Your body heats up in the bath and then when you get out, the drop in body temperature helps induce sleep.  Keep your bedroom temperature below 75 F and above 54 F.

White Noise
Traffic noise, city noises or other background noise can make sleep difficult. White noise can block out background noise. A fan is a great way to create white noise.

Dark Room
You have to get all the light out of your bedroom. Get rid of any electronics with lights. There should be no night light. Shut the door so no light can get in. Get light blocking shades for the windows.

These are just some of the suggestions Dr. Davidson had for sleep. In this week's challenge he also discusses the right kind of mattress and sleep position.  For his suggestions and his other tips for getting good sleep, sign up for the health challenge at the Max Health Chiropractic site.
http://www.maxhealthchiro.com/retrain-body-movement-patterns-foundation-training/

Here to your health and a great nights sleep.


*************************
Author at Aquathlon National Championship 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Monday, May 4, 2015

Week 2- World Championship Prep, All About the Bike

Getting ready to race at Bong 20K TT with a few friends.

"You always win when you make the full effort to do the best of which you are capable." - John Wooden

Monday-          Swim, 50 minutes
Tuesday-          Yoga 60 minutes
Wednesday-      Run 60 minutes
Thursday-         Bike class, hills 60 minutes
Friday-              Rest
Saturday-          Bike clinic, 3 hours, run 30 minutes
Sunday-            Bong 20 K Time Trail, 41:57, 4th place 55-59, Women

This week was all about the bike. Last year I struggled on the bike.  The bike leg is the longest part of a sprint triathlon. So struggling on the bike meant my triathlon times were slow all season. I was averaging 15 mph in races.  It felt like I was fighting my bike.

I'd taken the bike to PATCO Dallas for a para-triathlon race in early May. I thought maybe with taking the bike apart and re-assembling a couple of times, something went wrong with the way the bike fit.

So I had the bike re-fitted last September. The week after I hit 17.1 mp in a 20 K road race and qualified for the National Senior games in cycling.  It was a good start.

In last week's race I again averaged 15.3, but it was really windy and hilly. I was really anxious to see how the 20K time trail I had scheduled would go.

Twelve miles is a long way to race and keep up your pace. In marathons you have to keep up a steady pace and make sure you have enough to finish the race. I've really been working with my coach to push my pace especially in the bike part of a triathlon.

It was a perfect day for the race.  The temperature was in the high 60's with just a little bit of wind. It was cloudy, but the rain was supposed to hold off until evening. My coach raced as well as two other friends from my training group, Peak Performance Professionals. My friend Kim from P3 was also there to cheer us on and got pictures of each of us coming across the finish line.

The course was easy. One loop with three turns. It was a slightly hilly course.
I warmed up and was easily doing 18 mph and felt pretty good about it until one of the racers blew past me at about 25 mph. They all seemed to have aero helmets and aero bars. I ride a rode bike with a regular bike helmet.

Racers lined up by number and started one every 30 seconds. The racer behind me had spandex covers on his bike shoes. I asked why everyone was wearing them and he said like the aero bars and helmets, it provides an advantage.

Off I went,  the first stretch was windy, and there was a nice cross wind on one leg. I pushed it through most of the race. I took a little break twice, a move I later would find cost me third place. I missed by about 30 seconds. When I signed up there were only three in my age group. Two more signed on later. I would finish in 41 minutes 57 seconds with an average pace of 17.8 mph.

It's really nice to have a good race early in the season. It really helps to build confidence and set my up for success for the rest of the season.  Plus it was so much fun. Some day when I can't run anymore, I plan on bike racing.

I've got room for improvement, since I don't race on my drops yet, which would cut my wind resistance. I've got to leave some room for improvement.

Only bad thing that happened is my hands were numb through most of the race. That was a real distraction.

On Saturday, I attending an advanced bike handling class with my training group. I got to learn how to do a bunny hop on a bike. Riders us the bunny hop to go over obstacles in the rode. I don't have it mastered yet, but it gives me something to work on.  We spent lots of time learning how to ride a straight line, do cornering and ride in a group. All great skills for group riding.

Earlier in the week I went to and volunteered for the kick off meeting for the Bella Donna's a local women's cycling group. My coach has wanted me to do some group riding to push my pace and improve my skills.  Most groups seen too fast for me and she suggested this group. The group seems great and I'll do my first ride with them tomorrow night.
Team CMT members at Bike NY

It was all about the bike for Team CMT members at Bike New York. Members, Kris Tun, Matt Downing, Timmy Dixon, Robert Moore and HNF CEO Allison Moore all particpated in the 42 mile bike ride through the neighborhoods of New York. This is the third year the HNF has been chosen as a charity for the event.   Team members raised at least $1000 each and had preferred parking, breakfast and a Team CMT singlet. Well done team, proud of all of you for raising awareness and funds for CMT research and programs.

This weekend was all about the bike for Team CMT member Michael Watkins as he prepared for the Leadville 100 mile bike race in Colorado this August. He completed a 100 mile training ride in just over 7 hours.  Hope the training keeps going well for Michael. This high profile event will be a great place to raise awareness of CMT.

So this week was all about the bike. I'm going to keep working hard to improve my bike skills and pace. It's nice to have many of our Team CMT members on that journey with e.  That's how we'll all keep getting the best out of  ourselves.


****************
The author at PATCO Dallas 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 163 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing