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Monday, September 14, 2015

World Championship- Race Week

ITU Grand Finale Event by the Numbers


"The ultimate is not to win, but to reach within the depth of your capabilities and to compete against yourself to the greatest extent possible. When you do that you have dignity. You have pride. You can walk around with pride no matter what place you happen to finish." -Billy Mills, Olympic Gold Medalist, Running

Sun     9/6     Swim 80 min, bike 90 min
Mon    9/7     Bike 90 min
Tues    9/8     Bike 80 min, run 21 min
Wed    9/9     Swim 55 min, run 56 min
Thur   9/10    Bike 45 min
Fri      9/11    Rest
Sat      9/12   Bike 80 minutes, Swim 80 minutes
Sun     9/13   Bike 60 min

Mon    9/14   Bike 45 min
Tues    9/15   Run 30 minute
Wed     Race, Aquathlon World Championship, Age Group 750 m swim, 5 K run
Sat        Spring Race, 750 M swim, 20K bike, 5 K run


In just two days I'll be lining up with age group athletes from around the world in the age group aquathlon world championship race. I won't win anything and it really doesn't matter. I've taken a completely different approach this year to racing.

I've decided to focus on the process, to race well and enjoy the experience. I work to have the most mistake free race possible. I race to get the very best out of myself and let the results happen.

My coach told me I was certainly racing differently this year and it has been a lot more fun.  I've learned that getting the best out of myself is the real win. I've worked so hard and given up so much to get to the starting line this week.

I am not sure yet which race I will be doing on Saturday. There is a International Triathlon Union (ITU) PC Open World Championship race and a PC Open USA Triathlon race. The waves go off back to back.  CMT athlete Donna D will be in the ITU race. The talent is deep in the ITU race with single leg amputees grouped with those of us with neuromuscular conditions. Out of the 7 women in the category, my usual race time will put me 5th or 6th.

To participate in the ITU race I have to pass through medical classification. I have failed three times and there is no reason to expect the result will be any different. I was 10 points away last year. I will be seeing a different team this time. I hate the process because I feel like the assessors do not believe I have challenges.  It never feels good to be rejected. I could not ever race after last year's assessment because I was so upset. If I do not pass this classification, I may not be eligible to go through classification again. So my career at the ITU level is really on the line.

My coach and I also talked a lot this year about working on the things I can control. I can't control what happens in the assessment process. I can only work hard to be ready for whatever race I do on Saturday.   I am working really hard to be happy to race in either race.  I am working on accepting the outcome. I tell myself that if I do not get in, it just means God has something else in mind for me. I am right where he wants me and he does not make mistakes.

I try and remember how fortunate I am to be competing in triathlon and what a privilege it is to represent my country. If I do not pass through classification, I will line up for the USAT race and I will wear my Team CMT uniform. It is awareness month and the reason I started this journey was to raise awareness. I will be so proud to represent the CMT community at this event. So no matter what happens that work will go on.  I actually might have a chance to medal in this division. In any case I will focus on have a mistake free race, having fun and doing the very best I can.

See you at the finish!

*********************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 165 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, England and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing



Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Help an Athlete on the Road to Rio



" You have not lived today successfully unless you've one something for someone who can never re-pay you." -John Bunyan

I met Aaron Schneides last year at Para-triathlon Nationals in Phoenix.  It was one of eight National Championships and World Championships he  has won.  Aaron had reached out to me on LinkedIn after one of my appearances at Para Nationals.

Aaron is an Ironman finisher and winner of the visually impaired division of the Boston Marathon with a finishing time of 2 hr 47 min.

In 2011 Aaron was a finalist for an ESPY award for Best Athlete with a disability.

It seemed like Aaron was well on his way to the paralympic games in Rio. It will be the first time para triathlon will be included and Aaron looked like a favorite for a gold medal. He was excited to be representing the USA.

Then suddenly in 2014 it was announced only five of the seven categories of paratriathlon would be competing in Rio. His category, blind/ VI category had been dropped. Aaron suffers from juvenile macular degeneration and has only 15 % of his sight.

Despite that challenge Aaron has completed a doctorate program at Washington state and is a motivational speaker.  Aaron works with athletic federations to increase opportunities in sports for the visually impaired.

Not only did he lose his chance to compete, but he lost most of his funding and sponsors as well.

He thought about quitting. He has had to bounce back from adversity before, and this set back would be no different.

Instead of quitting or waiting for 2020, he decided the road to Rio was going to go through para-cycling.  This year is going to be very important for him as he races in para-cycling to make the US team. He will need to compete at both the national and international level.

Competing at the elite level is expensive. Not only does he have to pay his own expenses, but those of his guide as well. Visually impaired athletes are accompanied by a guide through the swim, bike and run of the triathlon.

You can help Aaron to raise the money that he needs to compete. You can make a donation or buy a tee shirt through his web site. You can watch a video about Aaron and his journey, read his blog and make a donation.    The address is www.cdifferentwithaaron.com


Aaron has had to start over in paracycling, I hope you will decide to join him on the road to Rio.
I know first hand how expensive it is to compete at the elite level of paratriathlon. I  will be supporting Aaron and hope you will too!

************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 165 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, England and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing

Monday, September 7, 2015

Week 20 World Championship Preparation, Racing and Ready

Wisconsin Senior Olympics Medals 2015

"If you search for your authentic best self during competition, you will find it. Victory often comes along for the ride as a pleasurable side effect." -Adam Kreek,  Olympic Gold Medalist Rowing


Sun        8/30      Weights 30 min, run 1 hr 20 minutes
Mon       8/31     Open water swim 40 minutes
Tue         9/1       Wis Senior Olympics, Cycling 10 K time trail (20 min), 20 K road race (39:10)
Wed        9/2       Run 40 minutes, Swim 55 minutes
Thur        9/3       Run 12 minutes, bike 1 hr 30 minutes
Fri           9/4      Rest
Sat            9/5     Swim 1 hr 20 minutes, Run 1 hr 20 minutes

My world championship race, is now only about 10 days away.  That same week in Chicago I'll also be doing a sprint triathlon.

I've cycled, and run, and done endless laps in the pool.  In addition to all that training, I race to get ready. One of those races was for the Wisconsin Senior Olympics. The race is the state championship for Wisconsin.

First up was a 10 K time trail. The course is a little less than 2 miles for each lap. Because of that you get close to your competitors,  Last year I finished 2nd in the time trail. I wanted to see if I could beat last year's time and maybe even win my age group.  In  time trail the racers go off one at a time.
So you can often tell your position in the race, by who you pass.  The course is in a local park on a closed course. There are just enough small hills to keep things interesting.

We would do 7 laps. As I finished the first lap, I caught one of the women riders.  We traded the lead back and forth. I would pass her and she would pass me.  She nipped me at the finish line. It turns out she was in my age group. I finished second by 30 seconds, but took a minute off of last year's time.

The next race was the 20 K road race. I was pretty sure I was the only women in my age group.  We all started in one large group. I decided to see if I could win the race and stuck to the wheel of the fastest woman rider.  I drafted on the straights and would pass her on the hills where she struggled. She would catch me again of the flat and so we went lap after lap.  Because the course was closed we could race the tangents.   She passed me right before the finish and beat me by 10 seconds.  I was proud I was able to hang with too better riders.  I finished in a time of 39:10, more than a minute better than last year.
 It was so much fun. All the hard work I have been doing has paid off, I took the gold to go with my silver from the first race.  I met lots of nice people, I was on a high the rest of the week. Having a fun fast race makes all the hard work worth it.  This is a great way to pave my way for my  upcoming races.

I was also contacted this week by the USAT. They want to feature me in a story about Team USA athletes.

I had my last outdoor pool swim and I will do my last open water swim this week. It has been a great season so far, with the best yet to come this fall.

*********************

Author racing for US Team at PATCO Dallas 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 165 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, England and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing




Sunday, September 6, 2015

Soup Sunday Asian Beef Soup with Rice Noodles

Asian Beef Soup with Rice Noodles
½ ounce dried Chinese mushrooms
2/3 cup boiling water
1 bunch green onions
8 ounces round steak sliced matchstick size
2 tablespoons grape seed or canola oil
1 clove garlic
1 large carrot, sliced matchstick size
1 teaspoon minced ginger
4 cups beef broth
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1 can sliced water chestnuts
1 bundle rice stick noodles prepared according to package directions
Break the mushrooms into pieces and place in a small bowl. Cover with the boiling water. Soak for 15 minutes. In the meantime heat the oil to the bottom of a stockpot.  Add the onions, garlic, ginger and beef. Cook until the beef is brown. Add the stock, the mushrooms, soy sauce and carrots.  Bring to a boil and then simmer for 40 minutes.  Add the rice wine vinegar and water chestnuts.  Simmer for  minutes. Add the rice stick noodles.

Serves 6

***********


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 165 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, England and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing******************

Friday, September 4, 2015

Show Your Hands, CMT Awareness Project

The Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation is continuing their popular Text2Give campaign this year with the theme “Show Your Hands.”

Everyday tasks such as holding a coffee cup, opening a gas cap, and buttoning a shirt can be challenging, and in some cases, impossible for those affected with CMT. Because there are different types of CMT, hand symptoms can also vary from patient to patient. People with CMT may experience the following hands signs and symptoms:

Contractures and bone deformities: This can “lock” the fingers in a flexed position, limiting normal range of motion.
Muscle weakness: Progressive loss of hand control.
Sensory loss: Sense of touch and temperature is diminished. CMT patients may experience cold hands, tingling, burning, and/or dry skin.

You can show your support for those living with CMT by participating in our Text2Give social media campaign.

Here’s how!
Text CMT to 501501 to donate $10.
Snap a picture of your hands with your mobile device.
Share your picture on any social media platform #ShowYourHandsCMT.
Share/tag your friends Text CMT to 501501 to donate.

You can also help spread the word by updating your Facebook cover photo or Twitter header photo with our #ShowYourHandsCMT banner http://www.hnf-cure.org/september-awareness-banners/

Together, let’s join hands and find a treatment and a cure for CMT hands!

Thursday, September 3, 2015

World Championship Prep Weeks 18 & 19, Riding through Adversity.

Wisconsin State 40 K TT Champion 55-59

  "Things do not necessarily happen for the best, but some people are able to make the best out of the things that happen. " -Tal Ben Shahar

Sunday      8/16     Ft Atkinson Lions Club ride 2 hours and run 80 min
Monday     8/17     Open Water Swim 45 min
Tuesday     8/18     Run 50 minutes, yoga 40 minutes
Wed           8/19     Wts 30 minutes
Thur           8/20     Bike 90 minutes, weights 40 minutes
Friday        8/21      Bike/ 40 minutes, Swim 60 minutes
Saturday    8/22       Bike 40 minutes, Swim 60 minutes


Sunday      8/23      Time Trail State Championship, 1st place women 55-59 Bong State Park
Monday     8/24      Swim 40 min, Wt, 30 min, Run 30 min
Tuesday     8/25      Yoga 45 minutes, run 40 minutes
Wed           8/26      Weights
Thru           8/27      Bike 90 minutes
Friday        8/28       Rest
Saturday     8/29       Bike 90 minutes, run 21 minutes, 60 minute swim

Triathlons start with the swim and the swim starts with gender and age waves.   My wave is usually one of the first waves in the race. That means I am usually done while other athletes are out on the course.

Your bike and all your other stuff stays in transition while you are out on the run.  Because other athletes are still racing, race officials do not let any of those finished into transition

This is not usually a problem.  The exception was a few years ago here in Milwaukee at the Age Group National Championship.  It was beginning to drizzle and many athletes were begging  volunteers to let them into transition to get their stuff. They needed to get in because they had flights to catch. Me I wanted to get my bike. As I told a volunteer " You don't understand my bike doesn't get wet".  I was totally serious. I never ride in the rain and my precious racing bike does not get ridden in the rain.  I was able to get my precious Fuji Altamira out of transition with no damage.

Well last year at the Chicago Triathlon we had the option of racking our bikes in transition the night before the race. Since I had a 6:30 a.m. swim start I thought that sounded like a good idea. One less thing to worry about in the morning.  Less chance of rolling over glass or anything else in the dark that might cause a flat.

I racked my bike and went up to have an ice cream on Michigan Ave.  The skies just opened up. I did not know it could rains so hard. My precious racing bike got a baptism.  The bike was not worse for the wear and I kind of got over the whole thing.

Good thing too since the weather was windy and rainy for the Wisconsin State Time Trial Championship.  I would be racing a 40 K, which is twice around the course laid out on the roads around Bong State Park.

I knew rain was predicted and was hoping it would hold off at least until I was through the 24 mile course. I had scouted out my competition and there was one, maybe two women in my age group. I thought I would not place first, but I wanted to ride as fast as I could to see how close I could get.

As I was getting ready, someone came back from a warm-up and said it was so windy he was going to change wheels.  Racing wheels with deep rims, the kind I have, can be hard to handle in a cross wind. The way the wind was blowing, we would have a cross wind twice on the course.

In a time trial you line up in line and the racers go off one at a time every 30 seconds or so. As I waited I ask the line official if he could hold off the rain.

About 100 yard into the rain started. I reached down to adjust my shoe strap and felt something hard hit my helmet.  It took me a minute to realize the sound I heard was hail. I thought about turning back. Then I realized it was warm and I should get a podium spot. I decided to tough it out.

A bit later it rained so hard, I had trouble seeing the road.  The cross winds were pretty bad, but I handled it and gained some good experience.   It continued to rain as I finished the first lap in 44 minutes or so. Not fast, but considering the rain and winds, it was OK.

I don't like riding in the rain because bike breaks do not work well when wet.   Lots or riders passed on the left, quite close. Even on the hills I did not have any trouble with the breaks.

It continued to rain and be windy on the second lap. I was soaked to my skin and I could feel water sloshing around in my bike shoes.  But I also realized I was having fun, It was warm and the rain felt good. I was pushing my pace the whole way and my thighs were burring. I did the best I could

I must have looked like I was struggling because one of the other women racers past me and yelled some encouragement to keep at it.  I sped up and finished strong.

Turns out I was the only women in my age group, but I will wear my championship jersey with pride.
On a tough day I stuck it out, did my very best under the conditions and had fun.

Sometimes the things we imagine happening to us are not so bad. The fear of the bad thing, like riding in the rain was so much worse than the actual experience.  Adversity is not something to fear, but to embrace.  Racing on a tough day made me a stronger athlete in lots of way.
I look forward to the next challenge.


***********************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 165 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, England and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing


Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Sowing Seeds for CMT Awareness

Little Free Library in my Neighborhood

"Small opportunities are often the beginning of great enterprises" - Demothenes

I have a great project for CMT awareness month and does not involve dying your hair blue or any ice bucket challenge.

Have you ever heard of the "Little Free Library"?  There are 30,000 of them throughout the world. I did a search on their web site and there are 17 of them within 10 miles of my house.

http://littlefreelibrary.com

The idea which started in Wisconsin is to build literacy.  You take a book and leave a book.

Here is how the premise is explained on their web site.

In the beginning- 2009 Todd Bol of Hudson Wisconsin built a model of a one room schoolhouse as a tribute to his mother, a former school teacher who loved reading.  He filled it with books and put it on a post in his front yard.  His neighbors and friends loved it. He built several more and gave them away. Each one had a sign that said FREE BOOKS.  Rick Brooks of the University of Wisconsin Madison, saw Bol's do-it-yourself project while they were discussing potential social enterprises.  Together they say opportunities to achieve a wide variety of goals for the common good. Each brought different skills to the effort.  They were inspired by many ideas:
  • Andrew Carnegie's support of 2,500 free public libraries at the turn of the century.
  • The heroic achievements of Miss Lucie Stearns, a librarian who brought books to nearly 1400 locations in Wisconsin through "traveling little libaries" between 1895 and 1914.
  • "Take a book, leave a book" collections in coffee chops and public places.
  • Neighborhood kiosks, Time-Banking and community gift sharing networks.
  • Grassroots empowerment movements around the world.


The goal of the founders was to bring communities together for something positive. I think we can build on their concept this month to build awareness of CMT and bring the CMT communities together.

A few months ago I took 10 copies of my book and seeded them in these "Little Free Libraries" in my neighborhood. I would often take a book along on a run or in my car and when I saw one of these, I would leave a copy of my book and take a book. I left a note with each book asking the reader if they liked the book to leave a positive review on Amazon and to pass the book on to another reader.

I am happy to say I have check on these little libraries and all of the books have been taken.

Now I'd like to ask the members of the CMT community, their family and friends to use these little libraries in their part of the world to raise CMT awareness.

My hope is you will order a copy of my book or one of the other CMT related books such as:

  • Arlene on the Scene by Carol Liu and Marybeth Sidoti Caldarone
  • Arlene the Rebel Queen by Carol Liu and Marybeth Sidoti Caldarone
  • He Walks Like a Cowboy: One Man's Journey Through Life with a Disability by Jonah Berger
Perhaps you would like to set up your own library in front of your house. You can buy a library from the web site. If you buy "The Little Free Library Book" by Margaret Aldrich, you will receive $150 to stock your library.  Check out the offer at their web site.


When I wrote my book, Running for My Life, Winning for CMT, I did not write if just for the CMT community. I wrote it to reach a wider reader audience. A runner may not pick up a book about CMT, but they will pick up one about running the Boston Marathon.

My book can be purchased through my website at www.run4cmt.com 
Select the book tab. Use the HNF code and $5 from each sale will go to CMT research and programs of the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation.

You can also go directly to the publisher web site at
http://henschelhausbooks.com/product/running-for-my-life-winning-for-cmt/

I am hoping you will join me in this effort. If you do please post your photos of your library on facebook or send me the photos. I have set up a pinterst account to post them.


The first step toward treatments and a cure is raising awareness. What made the ALS ice bucket challenge such a success last year, it almost everyone has heard of someone with the condition. Let's do the same for CMT. Let's put faces and names to CMT. Let's start some conversations with our neighbors. People will give to our fundraising efforts when they connect the condition to their friends and neighbors.

My commitment is to seed 20 more of these libaries this month. I hope each of you reading this will commit to place a book in at least one libarary or start a library if there is not one in your city.  With 150,000 Americans affected by CMT,think of what an impact we could make.

**********************
Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship. She has qualified to represent Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015.  

 In 2014 she represented  the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 165 members in 32 states. We also have members in Australia, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, England and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

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