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Sunday, April 20, 2014

Heart of a Champion

Scarf ladies at Old South Church Boston

"Everyone has some strength, something inside of them that makes them a champion. It's not about you; your fight is always about something greater. No matter what you go through in life, you can do whatever you put your mind to: and if hardship comes, God will always provide a way." -Loretta Duncan-Fowler from the book, Unbreakable Spirit by Lisa Nichols

The year after the 911 terrorist attack I was traveling on a small group tour in New Zealand. Our guide a self described hippie, started talking about the attack.  He stated that he did not care about what happened in New York, no one he knew got hurt and it did not affect him personally. So who cares was his stated opinion.

It made me angry. I wondered how someone could be so superficial and simple minded. What hurt any one of us hurts us all. I was deeply affected by the families that lost loved ones and those whose lives were changed forever by the attack.

I felt the same way about Boston. I was on the course when the attack happened and was never in any danger, but I was deeply affected, I was sad for those that lost loved ones or whose lives were changed forever by the event. I vowed to return and run the race again for them.

The city of Boston are champions. They could have reacted in anger. Instead they opened up their homes the day of the bombing to runners blocked from returning to their hotels. They made the choice to come together and open up their hearts. They have raised millions for victims. The family of Martin Richard have started a foundation in his name.

Ten thousand runners competed in the 5K and 10K race yesterday in support.

There will be victims of last years bombing running the race, some on have lost limbs and have had to re-learn to walk and run.  They are champions and am proud to run with them.

There will be firefighters running mourning the loss of two of their own from a recent fire. They will push past their pain and grief, they are champions.

Many will run in honor of those they have lost to illness. Other will run for charities, raising millions of dollars, champions all.

One Boston area women sent out 3000 ellow rubber ducks with Boston Strong painted on them to people across the country. We took them all over the country, took pictures and used the awareness to raise money for the Boston Strong Fund.

The ladies of Old South Church in Boston had their own response. They started a nationwide project with knitters to make scarves for the runners in the Boston colors of navy and yellow. They gathered 20,000 scarves to give to runners. Each one had a message of love and the name of the knitter.  I got one of these scarves. Each one was unique and when I selected mine, the giver said "I must wrap it around you.",  Then she said "May this scarf wrap you in love and courage." Now those are champions. Using their talent for knitting to project love and courage.  I can just picture my knitter quietly making my scarf with love in her heart. I wish I could thank her and meet her personally.

Every spectator will be a champion. By their presence they make me as a runner feel like a champion.  I will draw strength and love from their mere presence. They show together we can come together after an event and show the best we are capable of.

Every runner will be a champion. Every runner from elite to the back of the pack runners like myself will have to dig deep to finish.  We will run because we will not let fear keep us from the sport we love. We realize we are all vulnerable. Any one of us could have been hurt last year. We will not feel fear and if we do we will not let it keep us from living our lives.

As I stood at the finish line of the Lakefront Marathon in Milwaukee last fall, I realized how vulnerable we all are to attack or unexpected events. I did not feel any fear, nor am I afraid for the race on Monday. I just have determination to live my life and continue the work I am doing to raise awareness of CMT.

My Team CMT teammates and I  run for people with CMT that can't run. I want to show them what is possible, that you don't have to feel like a victim because of your condition.   We will have two CMT affected athletes running to show that while we have CMT, it does not have us. It was once thought that someone with CMT couldn't run. We're here to show them what is possible, that despite their condition, they can face life with grace and dignity.

Someone on LinkedIn said a few days ago, he was tired of the whole "Boston Strong" thing and none of us were special. I could not disagree more.

I think everyone does have special strengths and talents. Each one of us is on this earth for a purpose. Sometimes we have to dig deep to do the work we were born to do. Sometimes we have to push through are fears and our personal limitations. But we all have the chance to be champions, even if it is just knitting a scarf for a runner or handing out a cup of cup of water along a race course.

I will see lots of champions on Monday.  I am humbled and awed to be part of such a great experience and although it will be too warm to wear the scarf I was given, I know I will be running wrapped in love and courage. I can't wait.

See you at the finish!

*************************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 149 members in 27 states. We also have members in AustraliaCanadaVietnamTurkeyFinland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.


CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Superfood Saturday- Super Mom Oatmeal

Super Mom Oatmeal

2 cups old fashioned rolled oats
½ cup chopped walnuts
2/3 cup non fat dry milk
1/3 cup oat bran
¼ cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon flaxseed
2 tablespoons chia seeds.
2 tsp cinnamon
1 cup dried fruit (cherries, apricots, blueberries, cranberries, your choice)

Spread oats and nuts in a shallow baking pan. Bake uncovered in a 350 F oven for 15 minutes until oats are lightly browned. Cool in pan. Once cool, add fruit and the rest of the ingredients. Store mix in a jar or canister with a tight fitting lid.

For one serving combine ¾ cup water and 1/3 cup of the oatmeal mixture.  Microwave on 50% power for 8 minutes or until the cereal reaches the desired consistency.  Cereal will thicken a bit as it cools.  Let stand 4 minutes before eating.  Stir in honey or additional brown sugar to sweeten.

This will be my Boston Marathon race day breakfast. A little superfood to have a super race!  The picture does not look great because I made this in my hotel room microwave this morning. It tasted great!

Superfoods: Oatmeal, Chia seeds, dried cherries

****************************

Author at Cap Tex Tri 2013

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 149 members in 27 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT

Friday, April 18, 2014

Boston Marathon by the Numbers

Boston 2012 Finisher Medal


Jacqueline Gareau, 1980 Boston Marathon champ:

"The body does not want you to do this. As you run, it tells you to stop but the mind must be strong. You always go too far for your body. You must handle the pain with strategy...It is not age; it is not diet. It is the will to succeed."
Some interesting facts about the Boston Marathon in this morning's Boston Globe
Number of runners: 35,384
Number of Women: 15,964
Number of Men: 19,420
Most common names,  Michael for men, Jennifer for women

Race Distance: 26.2 miles

Course
Starts in Hopkinton
Goes through small New England towns including: Ashland, Framingham, Wellesley, Newton and Brookline

Finish: Bolyston Street, Copley Plaza, Boston

Course Elevation: Start 475 feet, finish 16 feet, mostly downhill first 10 miles, then rolling hills with Heartbreak hill at about mile 23.  This year we take back the finish line! We are all Boston Strong!

Spectators: 1 million
That is a lot of awareness for Team CMT.  I never ran big races until I started Team CMT. Now the bigger the crowd the better, because many more people will learn about CMT.

It is not just numbers when it comes to the Boston Marathon. Boston fans are the best!  They cheer for me like I am an elite athlete, even though I am in one of the last waves. They make me feel like a rock star!  I'm back this year to support them!

Hometowns
Runners come from all around the World: 17.7% of the runners are from outside the U.S. with 80 countries represented.

U.S.- every state will be represented with the highest number from Massachusetts with 7,888 and in 2nd place California at 2,612.

Age
Average age: 45, with 1,322 runners
Youngest:18
Oldest: 83

Start Times
Wheelchair:9:17
Elite Women:9:32
Elite Men: 10:00

My Wave (Wave 3): 11:00

The lead men will be finishing almost before I get my chance to start in Hopkinton.  It will be about 5 hours before I cross the finish line on Bolyston street.

This race cannot really be measured just by the numbers. Along the way I will give countless high fives, run through the scream tunnel at Wellesley, be cheered on by the students of Boston College, get a few hugs and shed a few tears along the way.  This is very likely going to be my last marathon....well at least for awhile. So it will be a bittersweet day for me.  A day that is going to have a place in my heart for lots or reasons that can't be measured by numbers.

**********************************



Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 149 members in 27 states. We also have members in AustraliaCanadaVietnamTurkeyFinland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.


CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT


Thursday, April 17, 2014

Boston Marathon Prep- Positive Affirmations




"Competitive sports are played mainly on a five and a half inch court, the space between your ears." - Bobby Jones, Championship golfer

Part of my getting ready for Boston was writing down positive affirmations.  It all part of the mental preparation for the event. Your mind does not know the difference between something you tell yourself or an event you visualize. It is as if it really happened.

Repeating these affirmations sets you up for success.  After writing them, then I review them every day, especially right as I am going to sleep. It is a little programing to assure success.

When I ran my first Boston Marathon, I set the goal to finish in the top three in my division. I visualized the third place finish and standing on the podium as they put the medal around my neck.  I finished 2nd and although I did not stand on the podium.....I went back to the hotel to take a shower instead of going to the aware ceremony.  That did not make the accomplishment any less sweet.

My goal is just to finish this year and here are my affirmations:

Positive Affirmations-Boston Marathon

1.)   My legs will remember.
2.)   I trust my training.
3.)   My legs are strong.
4.)   I am rested and ready.
5.)   I am excited to run to the finish.
6.)   I am smiling because I am having the time of my life.
7.)   I will remember this day forever.
8.)   I am loving the crowds.
10.) The crowds will push me to the finish.
11.) I own the pain.
12.) Tired is normal, I have the energy to finish.
13.) I’m mentally strong.
14.) Nothing can stop me.
15.) I run carefully, picking up my feet.
16.) I trust my training.
17.) I love running up hills.
18.) I love running down hills.
19.) Pain is temporary, quitting lasts forever.
20.) I run for those who can’t.
21.) I run for Boston
22.) I run for those affected last year.
23.) I am an athlete.
24.) The finisher medal feels so good around my neck.
25.) I am so proud of my finish.
26.) I run strong down Boylston Street.
27.) I give high fives and way all along the course.
28.) I love the crowds.
29.) I get energy from the steam tunnel at Wellesley.

30.) I get energy from the students at Boston College.

**************************

Author at 2013 Boston Marathon

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 149 members in 27 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Race Strategies


Cheryl Monnat and Chris Wodke at 2013 Boston Marathon

"Above all be the heroine of your own life, not the victim."- Nora Ephron

I did not feel good about my upcommng Boston race until I wrote out my race plan. I always have one in my head, but I've never written it down.  A race plan is really the goals you set for the race.

Writing goals down make you much more likely to achieve them. It puts the goal in your sub- conscious where your brain will drive you to success.  So it was plan my race and on Monday I will race my plan.  So here it is:

Nutrition Strategy
Week Before, fat loading from Sunday through Thrusday, carbo loading Friday though Sunday.

Day Before: lots of water and 10 ounces of tart cherrie juice and dried cherries to fight inflamation on race day.

Race Day Breakfast: oatmeal with chia seeds and dried fruit.
Race: Bike bottle with accelerade that I sip as needed, new bottle at mile 16. One Gu every 6 miles, Power Bar at lunch time. Water as needed if it is warm. I will let my body tell me what it needs. Take an occastional orange from the crowd.

Post Race, Tart cherry juice, and water. A big glass of wine and anything I feel like eating for dinner. I've earned it. I try and eat a bit of the food they give out at the race, but I am usually not hungry right after the race. I take it with me and nibble back at the hotel.

Pacing Strategy
Goal of 11:00 mile with little to no walking. Goal is 5 hr finish time.  Go out easy, lean into the down hill and let the hills do the work, just like in training.  Enjoy the down and let the energy take me right into the next hills.
Maintain pace just like training.
Though 20 miles, keep up the pace, one foot in front of the other.
20 miles +, run up heartbreak hill this year and finish stong down Boylston street.

Mental Strategy
Week Before Race- Write positive affirmations and review daily.

Day of Race- Mental check of how I am feeling. Remind myself this is marathon # 9 and #3 Boston. I can handle anything on race day.

Pre Race- Athletes Village- Relax, stay centered. Stay off my feet.  Mentally go over my pacing, nutrition and mental strategy. Visualize the race and how strong I will run.

Race
Enjoy seeing all the kids along the course.
Feel the energy of the start.
Give high five's all along the course.

Race Late
Draw energy from the crowds, especially  at Wellesley and Boston College.
Remind myself I am running for those with CMT that cannot run.
Remind myself I have dedicated this race to the victims and the Boston fans.
Think about staying strong fot that run down Bolyston street.
Remember I am strong.
Focus on the pain, think about spots that do not hurt.
Embrace the pain and keep going.
Remember how strong I am.
Imagine the finisher medal around my neck.
Try not to cry too much.

Plan the race and race the plan. All this is going to bring me to a successful finish of Boston Marathon number three. I can't wait.

*********************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 149 members in 27 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT



Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Boston Marathon Dedication


Author at 2013 Boston Marathon


"The greatest gift you can give (yourself or anyone else) is just being present."- Rasheed Ogunlaiu

I remember the night so clearly. It's like it was just yesterday, but it's been 3 years.  It was 11 pm, I had just gone to bed when the phone rang. It didn't take long to answer it because at that time I was keeping the phone receiver right by my bed.  It was the hospital where my mom was a patient.  Calls from her caregivers had become common.  It was common to get questions about medication or treatment.  This one was a little different.

The nurse called to ask if we wanted a breathing tube inserted or any other extraordinary measures. As the one in charge of my mom's care I knew she did not want that. We had talked about it.  I told the nurse she was moving her to hospice in a few days and we knew we were near the end.

The nurse said it is going to be sooner than you think. I got a chill because I knew he was right.  I got up the next day and was at my mom's bed side by 6:30 a.m. It was her last day with us.  There was nothing I could do for my mom that day except be present and I was determined to spend those last hours with just the two of us until the rest of the family arrived later in the day. All I could do was be there for her, so she was not alone.

I feel the same way about this year's Boston Marathon. I was on the course last year at mile 23 when we heard about the explosion.  That entire day up until that point had been one of celebration.  Fans as usual lined the course, handing out water, oranges, and high fives. Because I thought last year might be my last Boston  so I wanted it to be fun.

A friend of mine ran with me since as a Mobility Impaired runner I am allowed a guide. We stopped at many of the course landmarks to take pictures. My hands got numb from giving out high fives to students at Boston College late in the race.

My most vivid memory is of the kids. On the first turn there were lots of little girls dressed in pink so excited to see the runners and get a high five.  A little boy  about 4 years old standing with his dad about midway through the race, held out a single gummy bear to me. As I took it, he turned to his dad and said " She took my gummy bear." I will always remember the excitement in his voice. Fans like this little one all along the course treat you like an elite runner.

They stand for hours to cheer for us in the back of the pack as if we were elite runners. I heard a Boston native on the plane trip back to Milwaukee tell another traveler that they pride themselves on staying on the course as long as it takes to cheer for everyone.

The first year I ran Boston was in 2012, the year the temperatures hit 90 F.  Race officials talked to me personally to make sure I would be OK in the heat. The put my name in their computer system in case I showed up at a medical tent, so aid workers would be aware of my CMT.  Boston is one of the best run races I have ever been a part of. Everything is professional and world class. You are treated like an elite athlete.

Because of the heat fans all along the course brought out their garden hoses to cool us off and offered ice or to pour buckets of water over us. In that heat they stood for hours to cheer us on. The local fire departments in each small town set up water sprays.

When I wear my Boston Marathon jacket around Boston, the locals welcome me to the city, want to know where I am from and tell me how happy they are to have the runners in town.

What happened to Boston was devastating to so many on a personal level. Those who lost love ones may have a scar that never completely heals. Some of the injured have had their lives changed forever. Some will run the race and I am proud to run with them.

I cannot take away the pain of last year's events. What I can do is be present. I will do what runners do. I will be strong and run the race.  After so much love and support from the Boston crowds, it is my turn to give back. So this year I will dedicate my race to the people of the Boston area, the spectators along the course and those affected by last year's events.  The Boston fans have helpe me to finish two races, and it is my turn to give back. As Bruno Mars sings in my current favorite song; "We find out what we're made of when we're called to help our friends in need, you can count on me like 1,2,3 I'll be there, and I know I can count on you like 4, 3,2., that's what friends are supposed to do." So yes, I'll be there, even if it is the only thing I can do.

In the midst of so much evil last year, so many people stepped forward to help. Those with first aid training rushed to the scene or to local hospitals to help. Boston residents opened their homes to runners locked out of hotels.  The people of Boston and the small towns along the course deseved so much better than what happened. I cannot change what happened, but I can be there and run strong.  We will show once again just like the people that stepped forward on that day, that evil will not win. We will show there is more good than evil in the world and that love will triumph.

I know it is going to be an emotional day for me and many others. It will be a long, tiring and painful day, just like any marathon day. But I would not miss it for the world.  At least one more time Boston Marathon fans and I will be together.

I did not get to cross the finish line last year.  When I cross that line on race day it will be a victory for me and all the fans that got me there!

See you at the finish!

***********************
Author on left at Boston Finish line in 2012 before the race.

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 145 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT



Monday, April 14, 2014

Boston 3- Week 16, Trusting My Training



Participant Packet Boston 2014 Marathon


"A marathoner is a marathoner regardless of time. Virtually everyone who tries the marathon has put in training over months, and it is that exercise and that commitment, physical and mental, that gives meaning to the medal, not just the day's effort, be it fast or slow. It's all in conquering the challenge."-  Mary R. Wittenberg, President , New York Road Runners Club

4/7  Monday           53 F,  45 min run
4/8  Tuesday           50 F,  45 min swim, 30 min wts.
4/9  Wednesday      62 F,  1 hr 15 min bike, 25 min run
4/10 Thursday         61 F,   Rare day off from working out!!!!
4/11 Friday             61 F,   1 hr 15 min run
4/12 Saturday         48F,     50 min swim, 25 min wts.
4/13 Sunday           41 F     1 hr 45 min run

I was chatting with a couple of ladies after indoor bike class on Wednesday. One of them asked if I was getting ready for a race. Anyone doing a winter indoor class is probably getting ready for an early season race.

I told them I was getting running for Boston and they asked if I was ready.  I confessed I wasn't because I was doing a completly different training program with more cross training and much less running.  After doing so much runninig for all my other marathons, it did not feel like enough running.

My coach felt I had run too much in the past and that my legs were really beat up. My goal with this Boston was to finish and save my legs for triathlon season.

My legs have been much better this Boston. I have seen much better results in bike class and in the indoor tri I did in February.

This Boston I also turned over my training completely to my coach. It was tough to give up that control.
After I did my bi-weekly conference call with my coach Heather Haviland I felt much better.

I respect her and trust her training plan is going to get me through Boston. She has often reminded me that there are a lot of miles on my legs and they will remember on race day.

She also asked me to write out my race plan to pacing, nutrition, hydration and mental strategy. As I was wrote out my plan I realized the experience I bring to the race. I realized I've got it. Anything can happen on race day. But this is marathon number 9 and I have seen just about everyting on race day.

I've experienced, rain, cold, extreme heat, forgeting crucial items and one bombing. After writing out my plan I'm ready and excited.  Just one more step and that is to write out my positive affirmations that will get me through the race.

So if someone asks me now; I'm ready. There will be nerves and doubt as I stand at the start line. I'll be tired and I'll wonder if I will have the energy to finish the race. I'll wonder if I can handle the pain.

The anwer will be yes.  My coach also asked me to visualize the race. I can hear the crowds, especially on Bolyston street and the finish, which I missed last year. I can see the volunteer putting the finisher medal around my neck and I can't wait. Yes, I'm ready.

***************************

Guide Cheryl Monnat and author at 2013 Boston Marathon


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 145 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT