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Thursday, July 19, 2018

I Came, I Saw, I Raced, 2018 ITU Aquathlon World Championship



" The only person you have to beat on any given day is the person you were yesterday." -  Brian Meyer, Wisconsin Senior Games Athlete

I celebrated my 60th birthday with a trip to Denmark.  On July 12th I represented Team USA at the ITU Aquathlon World Championship in Fyn.   I had to balance lots of site seeing with race business for my week in Denmark.  I was blown away by what I saw and the people I met. The Danes were friendly and welcoming. The towns were saw were full of beautiful historic buildings. The food was incredible. Denmark and the race exceeded all my expectations. If you have not considered Denmark, put it on your list of places to visit.

This is as close as an age group athlete can get to the Olympics.  We wear the U.S. uniform, march in opening and closing ceremonies and have a full support staff of doctors and coaches.  There is even a team picture for each event.  You can see the aquathlon team was quite large.



There were 3000 athlete from 48 countries competing in aquathlon, duathlon, aqua bike and long course triathlon. I would be competing in Aquathlon (1000 meter swim, 5K run).  I would be racing in the 60 to 64 age group for the first time with 10 other athletes including the  current national champion.  I was hoping to stay off the bottom of the age group.

I also qualified in aqua bike and long course triathlon, but the $500 entry fee and the expense of shipping my bike was just too much while I am unemployed.

This race started with some drama even before I left the States.   In the past athletes had been able to wear uniforms from past championships. I had two uniforms from when I raced in Chicago and Cozumel.  Because I have been out of a job since the end of January, I did not want to spend $200 on a uniform.  I was already spending money for a rental car, lodging and plane ticket.

The Saturday before I left, an email came out from the team manager, that old uniforms would not be accepted. There was a new sponsor and we would not be able to compete unless we bought a new uniform.  We were informed uniforms would be inspected before entry into transition.  No new uniform, no competition.

So I logged onto the site to place an order. There were no women's tops left, so I ordered a men's extra small and paid for two day shipping.  When the uniform did not arrive on Tuesday I started to worry. I was leaving at 9 am on Friday morning. I was told by the company the uniform would arrive sometime on Friday. Fed Ex was no help either. I tried to get them to deliver first thing in the morning or to let me pick it up.  No luck, but they did confirm that the uniform supplier had made a mistake in the shipping.

Armed with that knowledge I went back to the uniform supplier. It took a bit of bullying, but I got the company to ship the package to the Team USA hotel. I was able to pick it up when I arrived in Odense, the host city.

The next glitch happened when I tried on the uniform. The top was so tight I could barely get it on and the bottoms were not much better.  I would have to use body glide to get the pieces on for race day. I was not sure I would be able to breath. I had visions of passing out on the course.

As members of Team USA we got daily email updates from Lauren Rio the team manager. Two days before my race, the email broadcast detailed the jelly fish problems during the swim of the Cross triathlon event.  The cold water was also a concern for me. The temp was listed as 61 F. I had problems with cold water in an event in June here in Wisconsin and had to drop out because I could not catch my breath.  Too many people knew I was doing this race, so to not complete it would be an embarrassment. I was starting to feel the pressure.

Wednesday the day before the race was the team picture and swim practice at the marina in Middlefart, Denmark. I got to town early and did some sight seeing.  I decided not to do the swim practice.  Reports from those that did practice was the jelly fish were stinging. You could see them from the dock at the swim practice.

The team picture was fun. I was amazed how big the team was. The sport is really growing. After that was the team briefing. I normally do not go to them, but this was a really important race and it was a chance to get out of the hear. It had been in the upper 50's and suddenly the heat was in the mid 80's. It would be hot for race day

The jelly fish were a point of discussion for the race. The race organizers said they would have Vaseline to cover any exposed skin. This would help minimize the stings. The event doctor also went over treatment for the stings post race. He recommended vinegar, shaving the skin and hydrocortizone cream.

One of my favorite things about this race is transition did not open until 1 pm.  It is nice not to have to get up in the dark to go and race.  I was able to get to the venue early and get a close parking spot.

We were inspected going into transition.  I had put my arm tattoos upside down, a rookie mistake. So I was worried I would not be allowed to race.  The officials did not think it was a big deal.

Transition is different at ITU. You are not allowed to mark your spot at all. You get a little basket.



You get a nice placard with your name and race number. I was right next to the current national champion, Sharon Smith. She would go on to win our age group.   Everything has to go in the bin as it is used.  Things like running shoes do not have to go in, but it is wise to have them in the bin so they do not get kicked as athletes go by coming out of the swim. 

After all the pre-race drama, the race went really well.  I always get out of transition right after setting up. All the tension there, gets me stressed. I made my way over to the swim practice area to warm up.

The water was so cold I was getting a headache. I was wearing two caps to help with the cold. My strategy was to swim free style until I could not stand it and then switch to side stroke.

 I could see lots of jelly fish and was getting stung.  I decided to relax and hang out in the water just to keep cool. I watched some of the other waves take off so I could be sure of the course.

Soon it was my turn to line up and get my application of Vaseline.

The swim went really well. I kept a good course and there were swimmers around me, meaning I was not last.  I saw jelly fist the whole way. One was the size of a salad plate and I put my hand right on it as I took a stroke.  I could feel my hands, feet and face getting stung.  The warm-up helped. I did not get a headache during the swim or get out of breath. I felt comfortable. I finished in just over 20 minutes.

In transition I was closely watched by a race official.  I told him I knew that my used equipment had to go in the basket and that it was his job to do that.  He smiled.

The run was a one loop flat course. Super easy. I always feel like the run is the celebration. I have been doing run races that it is second nature.  Plus there is little chance anything will go wrong.  It was hot, but there were three water stops on the 5K course. At ITU you get water in little plastic bags. You have to bite off the corner and it seems I always lose half the water.

The course was through residential neighborhoods.  Lots of the folks were sitting on lawn chairs in their drive ways cheering us on. A few days earlier one of the residents approached me because I was wearing my Team USA jacket. She told me how excited the community was for the race.

Before I knew it I was running down the blue chute to the finish line.   Lauren Rios handed me a small American flag that I proudly waved as I crossed the finish line.

My goal was to not finish last and to better my time of 63 minutes from Cozumel. I finished in a time of 61 minutes in 5th place in the 60 to 61 age group. I was in the top three of American finishers.  The top finisher was 20 minutes faster.  What mattered to me what that I had fun and had a great race!  The next World Championship race is in Spain next year.

I got a new job this week and the first thing I did after accepting the offer was to sign up for the Aquathlon National Championship race in Miami in November.

I will train for the race, but my primary focus will be training for the New York marathon which happens the week before.

*******************************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015i, Cozumel in 2016 and Denmark in 2018. In 2018 finishing 5th in the 60 to 64 age group.

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 214 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA



Thursday, July 5, 2018

Pleasant Prairie Triathlon-Para triathlon National Championship



He who has a "why" to live can bear almost any how." Fredrich Nietzsche
I wrote this article for USAT about my experience at recent para-triathlon championship at the Pleasant Prairie Triathlon on June 24th.  I submitted the article as part of my role as a USAT ambassador.


On Sunday June 24, the Para-triathlon National Championship was held at the Pleasant Prairie Triathlon, in Pleasant Prairie Wisconsin.  Thirty four athletes competed in the National Championship wave and 19 in the Physically Challenged Open wave.

USA Triathlon (USAT) has created events for athletes with qualifying impairments to complete not only at the National Championship, but at any USAT sanctioned race.  I am not  aware of any other sport that offers this kind of opportunity at the grassroots level.
Anyone that competed in the National Championship wave had to meet a time standard for their class and go through a medical assessment.  I did not have an event last year that was the required swim distance of 500 meters, so I would race in the physically challenged open division.

Impairments that qualify include:
  • ·         Impaired muscle power
  • ·         Impaired passive range of movement
  • ·         Limb deficiency resulting from amputation due to trauma or congenital deficiency
  • ·         Hypertonia, resulting from cerebral palsy, brain injury, stroke or multiple sclerosis
  • ·         Ataxia resulting in cerebral palsy, brain injury, multiple sclerosis, Friedrics ataxia
  • ·         Athetosis from cerebral palsy, stroke or brain injury
  • ·         Visual impairment from myopia, tunnel vision, scotoma, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, macular degeneration

This would be my 5th time racing in the PC Open division.  I have placed 1st twice in Austin, Texas and in Tempe Arizona.  I have Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) which is a genetic neuromuscular condition. 
I have a gene that over produces a protein. It causes the covering of my nerves to break down.  Imagine a road with lots of pot holes. You get a pretty bumpy ride.  The nerve break down means that it takes someone like me with CMT about twice the energy to do even everyday tasks.   I battle fatigue every day.  Because the electrical signal to operate muscles is compromised, they start to atrophy.  In my case this causes issues with balance and foot drop. I can easily trip when running. The muscle weakness compromises my swim, run and bike times.

I’ve lost most of the muscle in my forearms so my swim is slower than most athletes.
Many people with CMT wear braces to enable them to walk. I am lucky, I can still run, although much slower than I used to as my CMT progresses.   CMT also affects my breathing and I have moderate hearing loss. I have constant ringing in my ears.
I share this condition with many of my family members and 160,000 Americans. We call it the biggest disease that no one has ever heard of.  There are more Americans with CMT than ALS and as many as have MS. 

When I was diagnosed in 2011, I felt that I was so lucky that I was still so active when many with this condition struggle to write, open a jar, or button the buttons on their clothes. They are robbed of the ability to do some of the simplest tasks of life.  Many including some of my own family members keep their CMT a secret. CMT can be invisible to the casual observer.  I think sometimes other para-athletes look at me and wonder what I am doing in the competition.

So here I was still able to swim, bike and run. I felt I had been granted a gift I wanted to use to inspire those with CMT and to raise awareness.  I wanted to be an example to others with CMT to remain active. The progress of the disease can be slowed by staying active.
Before I was diagnosed I had quit competing because of slowing running times and burning feet.  I came out of retirement and began doing runs and triathlons.  I founded Team CMT to engage others in the mission. We have grown to over 200 members in 39 states and six countries.  It was once thought that no one with CMT could run, yet we have dozens of CMT affected athletes. Team CMT members have raised over $130,000 for CMT research and programs.

I go to high profile events like the Boston Marathon and National Championships to compete and write about the experience. By doing so I hope those with CMT will choose to be active and open about their condition.

This race was my first triathlon of the season.  The nice thing about racing para is accommodations are made for our abilities. For instance the swim start is in the water. No need for me to worry about my foot catching on the run into the water.

As I waiting in the water I worried. I was really tired and I always wonder if I will have the energy to get around the 750 meter swim course. The buoys always look so far away.   The first race of the year always means a struggle in the swim. I had dropped out of a swim/run race just a month ago.  Several years ago I dropped out of swim in this same race venue. I just did not have the energy. I wondered if today would be a swim success or a swim failure. If I can survive the swim, the rest of the race is much easier.

As I waited I also reminded myself I had swim twice the race distance without stopping in the pool. The gun went off and I just took it one stroke at a time.   Several times I got way off course and wasted time getting back in line with the course buoys.  About 20 minutes the swim was done.

The bike part is my favorite and the easiest. I feel like a kid when I ride my bike. I love the feel of the wind in my face.  In most races, other athletes, constantly whiz past me. In a Para race I am more evenly matched.

I was racing a tri-bike for the first time. Because my balance is compromised, I was worried about the balance. I had a couple instances when I almost lost balance, especially when I tried to take a drink of water.  My bike computer refused to turn on, so I had no idea of speed or distance.  All seemed to be going well. I had passed several athletes in my category.  Disaster struck twice when I missed a turn on the course. I had followed two other racers.  A police officer came after us and got us back on course.  Then a volunteer directed me and another athlete back on the course instead of back into transition. 
The run was very uneventful, but very nice around Lake Andrea where we had done our swim. The problems on the bike portion cost me first place.  The last time I did this race I finished in 1:43:42, today my time was 1:59:12 on a better bike. Good enough for 3rd place. The placement does not matter, what I wanted was my best race without mistakes.  I felt I had not done my best.  I will get a chance again in a feel months when I race the Iron Girl triathlon on the same course. 
No medal to show for all my work.  After waiting for 2 hours, they could not find medals for the PC open group. This happened the last time I did the Pleasant Prairie Triathlon. After two weeks and two emails I still don’t have my medal.

Someone asked me this week how I define success. For me as a CMT affected athlete, it’s crossing the finish line. Every race I start and finish is a victory.  Success is being the best athlete possible and using the ability I have to inspire and to raise awareness of the condition I share with so many others.  I race to put a name and a face to this condition.

I crossed both lines today wearing my Team CMT uniform. Hopefully my follow athletes and the spectators will take a bit of time to learn about CMT. Perhaps they will stop to consider that not every impairment is visible and that many of us have private struggles no one knows anything about. I hope they will learn that a life lived with purpose, is a great life, even with the challenges of a condition like CMT.



Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016. 

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/




Monday, July 2, 2018

Bender Beer Garden 5K Run



"An early morning walk is a blessing for the whole day"- Henry David Thoreau

If the walk is a great way to start the day, then a 5K run is a great way to end an evening.  I love evening runs, no early morning wake up call. I ran in the the Bender Park Beer Garden 5K on June 7th.

This series has been following a traveling beer garden to Milwaukee Country parks. This race was a chance to discover a new park. I had never been to Bender Park even though I worked right next door for four years. I had no idea this park even exited. It is truly a hidden gem on Lake Michigan.

There is a boat launch, pavilion and miles of bike trails with views of Lake Michigan.

I got to do a bit of a bike ride before the race to warm up and had the place practically to myself.

The evening was cold for June. The race time temperature was 53F with some wind. 

The race started with a climb up the road of a bluff with an elevation of 78 F. There was more adventure as we ran through the sand of a torn out parking lot.  The run was all on bike trails, so there was not traffic and the course was well marked.

We had one more trip down and back up another bluff. I am not sure why race directors love hills so much. Lots of people walk them. I take them as an opportunity to excel. I repeat to myself that I love hills and that I am a mountain goat.  That helps me to run strong and I always place well when I run a course with hills.

I finished in 30:59. Not great, but not too bad with the large hills.  I talked to another woman in my age group after the race. She was a couple of minutes faster than me so I figured I would not be in the top three. It was so cold and windy that I gave up waiting for awards. Wouldn't you know it, I placed 2nd in my age group.  Luck for me I was able to get my award at a race I worked as a volunteer.

It was a great night with a surprising result.  The race really was a great way to spend the evening.

************************



Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA



Sunday, July 1, 2018

Slow Cooker Sunday- Ginger Beef


Ginger Beef



1 1/2 lbs stew meat
1/2 cup arrowroot
2 tablespoons coconut oil melted
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced ginger root
3/4 cup beef bone broth
3/4 cup soy sauce
1/3 cup rice wine
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 carrots grated
1/2 white onion coarsely chopped

Cut the stew meat into bit sized pieces. Add all of the ingredients to the crock pot. Stir to be sure the meat is well coated.  Top with a bit of fresh ground black pepper. Cook on low for 4 to 5 hours.  Serve over rice or noodles. Garnish with sliced green onions.

Serves 4


************************



Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA



Saturday, June 30, 2018

Super Food Saturday- Frozen Grapes



The heat index is in triple digits this weekend in Milwaukee. These grapes are a really great treat when it is really hot. They are really simple to get ready as well.

Red grapes contain anti-oxidants and flavonoids that are helpful in promoting heart health, weight loss, eye healthy, colon health and eye health.

They contain vitamins, C, A, K, and B6.

They are also rich in thamine, riboflavin, niacin, and folate. They contain the minerals potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and sodium.

They are a fruit meaning they contain sugar, so keep the amount you eat in line with your desired daily calorie in-take.  One cup has about 100 calories

Grapes are also contain lots of water, which is great for staying hydrated on a hot day.  These are super easy to make.  I washed a couple of bunches of grapes and removed them from the stem. Then I placed them in the freezer in a plastic bag.

This week it was 96 F and humid, so it was a perfect chance to enjoy these.  They were sweet and really refreshing. They are a great substitute for dessert after a meal.

************************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Salad Sunday- Creamy Broccoli Coleslaw Salad



This makes a really large amount of salad. I made this to serve as a main main. It would also be great to take to a gathering to serve as a side.

Creamy Broccoli Coleslaw Salad

1 (12 ounce) bag of broccoli coleslaw
1/2 red cabbage shredded
1/2 green cabbage shredded
4 carrots shredded
2 apples cored and chopped ( leave skin on)
1 cup of shredded mozzarella cheese
1/2 jicama peeled and cut into bite sized pieces
1/2 cup dried cherries

Dressing
1 jar(30 ounce) Miracle Whip
8 ounces sour cream
1 tablespoon dry ranch dressing

Combine all of the ingredients in a large salad bowl.  Combine the ingredients for the dressing. Add to the salad mixture and mix well.  Top with fresh ground pepper. Chill for 4 hours before serving.
Makes 8 main dish or 20 side dish servings.

***********************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA


Saturday, June 16, 2018

Super Food Saturday- Raspberry Chocolate Chip Brownies


Raspberry Chocolate Brownies

1/2 cup gluten free oats
1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup vanilla whey powder
2 eggs
1/4 cup honey
2 teaspoons chocolate extract
1 1/3 cup almond milk
2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
1 cup frozen raspberries, thawed
1 1/2 cup milk chocolate chips
1 cup pecan pieces

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Coat a 9 inch round cake pan with coconut oil. Set aside,Place the oats in a blender and grind until they make a fine flour.
Put the oats into a mixing bowl. Add all of the ingredients except the chocolate chips and nuts. Mix well.  Add half of the chocolate chips and mix well.  Pour the mixture into the prepared pan. Top with the other half of the chocolate chips and the pecans.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.  Remove from pan once cooled and cut into wedges.  Serves 8


**********************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book "Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating".

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA