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Sunday, September 9, 2018

Soup Sunday- Thai Chicken Coconut Soup

Thai Coconut Chicken Soup


1 can ( 14 ounces) coconut milk
2 cups chicken bone broth
2 tablespoons coconut oil
1/2 small yellow onion
1 stalk lemon grass
1 teaspoon minced ginger root
3 cooked chick drumsticks
1 cup fresh shitake mushrooms, sliced
Juice of 1 lime
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon Thai chili paste
1/4 cup fresh cilantro

Cook the onion and mushrooms in the coconut oil.  Once the mushrooms are soft, add the chicken broth and coconut milk.  Add the ginger, lemon grass, lime juice, fish sauce, and chili paste.
Remove the chicken from the bone and add to the soup.  Simmer on low heat for 10 minutes.

Spoon into bowls and add chopped cilantro.

Serves 4
***************************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 210 members in 38 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, Scotland, France, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA


Monday, September 3, 2018

Wisconsin Senior Olympics- Track Meet


"Patience, persistence and perseverance are the three virtues of extraordinary performance." - Jerry Lynch, Author of Running Within

On August 19, I competed at the Wisconsin Senior Olympics track meet. This was the first time I've ever done a track meet of any kind.  Trying new events keeps things fresh for me.

The meet was at Homestead High School in Mequon, Wisconsin.  The facility was really impressive.  They have a state of the art track and a large concession area that was open during the event.  It seemed more like a college facility.

I signed up for pretty much every track event scheduled at the meet, just to try them out.

Power Walk
I started the day with two power walk events, a 1500 meter and 5000 meter power walk.  The refs explained all of the rules and that they would be judging us all the way around the track. 

I wore a race number just like a running race.  I did not even have to keep track of my laps. I got an update each time I went around the start line. I would joke with them every time I came around.

The group racing was small. I was just about 20 seconds behind the lead woman and I got lapped by one of the men in the 5000 meter race. I would finish with a silver, just 40 seconds behind.

In the 1500 meter race, the refs called me to the front line ahead of the group because I was "fast".  I took the lead in the women's race right at the start and held it for the entire race. I finished in 10:57.

The track events all went by pretty fast. The meet ran right on time. I planned on running in between events because I had to do my long run of 16 miles.   The events happened one after another, with no time to run.  It was really hot and humid so running was out of the question.

For most of the events the officials let us know who was in our age group.  I knew I was in trouble when one of the women in my age group showed up wearing spikes. 


50 Meter
I found out that I am no sprinter. I finished in 5th, but one of the athletes was from out of state. Which meant I finished 4th in the state and qualified for the national games.  I finished in 13:43

100 Meters
I finished in 4th, but 3rd in the state in a time of 23:31, well behind the leader.

200 Meter
Since I was so far behind in the first races, I had decided to skip this one. But one of the athletes, told me this was my race and that I should do it. She swore I would beat her. At the gun, she took off and finished ahead of me. She had not registered for the race, so I took 3rd in 55:19.

400 Meter
There were just three of us, one from out of state, so I finished in 2nd with a time of 2:02.

800 Meter
I was the only one from the state in my age group. I finished with a time of 4:33

1500 Meters
I was actually competitive in this race right up until the end.  I was in third place at the start. I could here the athlete coming behind me. She passed me on the last lap.I tucked in behind her thinking I would pass at the end. She made a move and I could not cover it.   I finished just 20 seconds behind. I really am a long distance runner. This was the race I was at least competitive.

The race was lots of fun. I ended up winning six medals and qualifying for the national games next year in New Mexico.  I got three gold, two silver and a bronze. My ankle also held up fine, so I will be doing more track workouts in the future.

I had a great time and met lots of really nice people. I am looking forward to doing this meet again next year.

**********************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015i, Cozumel in 2016 and Denmark in 2018. In 2018 finishing 5th in the 60 to 64 age group.

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 217 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA


Sunday, September 2, 2018

Skillet Sunday- Bamboo Rice



I made this rice to go with the lime shrimp recipe I posted last week.  I got this rice from Nuts.com.
It is a really pretty green and is supposed to be high in anti-oxidants.

1 cup bamboo rice
2 cups chicken bone broth
1/2 cup diced carrots

Put all of the ingredients in a rice cooker. Cook for 20 minutes or so until all of the broth is absorbed. Fluff up the rice before serving.

Serves 4

******************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, Scotland, France, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA


Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Iron Girl Sprint Triathlon- My Murphy's Law Race




"Start where you are, use what you have, do what you can." - Arthur Ashe


I usually have a reason for any race that I add to my season schedule.  I wanted a chance at being nationally ranked in triathlon and that takes three race. This would be the third race that I needed.

It was also a chance for a do-over.  The Pleasant Prairie Triathlon where the Para-triathlon National Championship was contested was in the same location and run by the same race organizers.

This race would be women only with a sprint distance and a duathlon.  The swim would be straight across the lake instead of a triangular course.   I missed the bike turn around in the first race and was directed the wrong way by a volunteer. I wanted to improve on the terrible finish time I had of 2 hr 2 minutes.

Since this was a USAT sanctioned race, I signed up to race in the physically challenged division.

I did not sleep one wink the night before the race. I don't know why that is, because after 6 years of doing triathlons, I don't have any nerves.  It adds stress to not sleep at all and watch hour after hour go by. I lay there knowing I am going to feel terrible because of the lack of sleep.

Transition opened at 5 am and I was at the race venue at 4:45. I wanted a parking spot close to transition. I was far from the only early arrival.

I went through the usual routine of setting up my area. I checked over my bike.  Both wheels spun freely clearing the brakes. The chain was on the large chain ring, but I left it since the course is super flat in the beginning.

I put down my transition bag at the end of the bike rack. The women with her bike at the end protested saying she had to set. I pointed out she could not set up in the aisle and she said she was going to. She had a wet suit slung over one arm. The race was not wet suit legal, meaning she would be in the last wave and not eligible for awards. I did have an exemption from the wet suite rule.  PC athletes can wear a wet suit up to 78 F without penalty. The water temp that morning was measured at 72 F,

When the athlete was done setting up her area (in the aisle) my rack neighbor pointed out there was still room next to her stuff. We both put our bags down and there was still room. She went crazy, yelling at me. Sleep deprived as I was, I started yelling too, asking here why she was being such a bitch and that there was room for everyone.  I told her I was moving my bag and she continued to yell.  I left transition to get away from her. Not my finest hour. 

I did not realize I had dropped one of my swim ear plugs during the argument. I did not discover it until I got to the starting line. Because the swim is a point to point across Lake Andrea, I had to walk almost a mile to get to the start. I was not going to walk back to transition to look for the missing ear plug. The sun would be on my left shoulder so I figured I would only breath to one side and be fine.

For some reason race directors always put me in the elite field when I race PC.  The field was really small with only 7 women. Iron Girl was the same weekend as Age Group Triathlon Nationals, so the better athletes were probably there.

I got to sit on the beach and wait for the start. I got to visit with a few of the other athletes and watch the sun come up. It was the most beautiful shade of red.  It is etched in my memory.

I warmed up for the swim and was glad I had a wet suit. The water felt colder than 72 F. 
The 750 meter swim would turn out to be one of the easiest I had done.  There were buoys on the left and swim rafts on the right.  The swim lane was wide. I was right with about half of the starting group and finished with a swim of 18:30, not too bad.

I got to transition and could not find my bike.  I had carefully walked everything done. My transition mat is lime green, so it is easy to find. Someone had moved my bike way down the rack.

When I got to the mount line I discovered my bike chain was jammed against the frame and I could not move. Two guys jumped out of the crowd to help me. They could not get the chain unstuck. I finally took over. I have replaced slipped chains many times and I had it back on in a minute.

Did my end of the aisle friend move my bike?  I don't know. Some athletes told me during the race briefing that bikes were supposed to be racked in numerical order. There was noting about that in the athlete guide which I read. There were no numbers on the rack. So it is possible a late arrival moved my bike to rack hers in numerical order.

In any case the lost bike and stuck chain probably cost me seven or eight minutes.

My bike computer refuse to turn on so I was riding blind.  I was trying to go as fast as I could to make up time.  There were lots of athletes cycling in the left lane.  One absolutely refused to move to let me through. As I passed many athletes, I nicely let them know that slower riders should stay to the right. I stayed to the right unless I was passing.

I saw the turn around this time, although the sign was really small. I commented to an athlete near me, how easy it would have been to miss it.

There rest of the race was routine. The run was hot and humid. I finished the race in 1 hr 43 minutes, much better than the over 2 hours for my last attempt.  I had wanted to have a clean race.
This was far from it. It was a little disappointing because I did not feel like I had my best race. I handled every curve this race through at me.  Kind of like life, you just do your best with what life throws at you.

Despite everything that happened I had fun and finished.  One of my goals for this race, was to get a time to qualify for Partriathlon National Championships next year. I did not achieve that goal, but without the mishaps I would have been close. I just might have to sign up for one more race this year.

**********************************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015i, Cozumel in 2016 and Denmark in 2018. In 2018 finishing 5th in the 60 to 64 age group.

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 217 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Super Food Saturday- Anthony's Pickles



Today's recipe comes from one of my newer family members. Anthony married my niece Brittany last year. They were home a couple of weeks ago for a family wedding.  He shared this recipe with me during the visit. Welcome to the family Anthony! You are a great edition!

Dill Pickle Recipe

2 cups water
1 cup white vinegar
2 tablespoons Kosher salt
2 tablespoons sugar
Garlic, dill (optional)  I used a few stalks of dill and two teaspoons of garlic.

Heat until dissolved. Fill a sterilized mason quart jar with picking cucumbers.  Add the vinegar mixture to the jar. Add the dill and garlic. Cover with a canning lid and screw top.  Place in refrigerator for 5 to 7 days. Shake daily.

Makes one jar.

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Salad Sunday-Cucumber Salad





Cucumber Salad

3  Roma tomatoes
1/4 white onion chopped
1 cucumber
1 cup Kefir
2 tablespoons fresh chopped chives
pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper


Seed and chop the tomatoes. Place into a large salad bowl.  Add the onions. Chop the cucumber in large pieces, leaving the peel. Mix the Kefir, chives,  salt and pepper.  Add to the vegetable mixture in the bowl. Chill for 4 hours before serving. Serves 4

************************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Wisconsin Senior Olympics- 5K/10K Race- A Run of Bad Luck


"Don't say I Can't, Say I presently struggle with." - Tony Horton

I have to say my 2018 season has not exactly been a charmed one. I have had lots go wrong in a variety of races. My luck did not really change on August 10, when I raced at the Wisconsin Senior Olympics (WSO) 10 K race in Racine.

The race is one of many events run in August and September for Adults 50 years of age and older. This event was also open to the public, but scored separately for the WSO athletes.

I look forward to WSO events all season, especially the road race  I had done this event a couple of years ago. The course starts in Pershing Park and runs along Lake Michigan.

The bad luck started the morning of the race when I work up with a slight case of food poisoning.  So I went into the event a bit dehydrated.  .

When I picked up my packet, I really thought about dropping down to the 5K, but a 6 mile run was on my training plan.  It was already warm and humid for the 9 am race start

My plan was to use the race like a tempo run. Hold back the first mile,  run at about 70 percent for the next three miles, and cool down for the last mile. 

I hit the first mile at a 9 min 30 second pace.  I did not have much energy when it came time to up the pace.  I got to a spot where a volunteer was sitting on a turn for a bridge. He said to follow the arrows. I followed another runner up and over the bridge.

Too bad for me, I had just missed the turn around point. I ended up going all the way over the bridge, adding at least a 1/4 mile to my run.

So now I had some work to catch up to the rest of the runners. I think there were just two in our age group. I could see her and worked to catch her.  I did it, but was not feeling great as I passed her. She kept close behind me.

I started to feel shaky and had a decision to make.  We were headed back to the start and I could finish and call it a day or go through the start and out onto the 3 mile loop for the 10 K course. Since I  was racing Iron Girl sprint triathlon the next day, I decided to do the smart thing and do just the 5 K.  It was not easy. I knew I was giving up a good shot at 1st place.  That was not easy to do because it does not happen all that often.  The athlete in me really likes to win.

 I let the timer know after I crossed what I had done.   I ended up in 2nd for the 5 K with a time around 34 minutes. The missed turn cost me 1st place.  It was a dumb mistake on my part.

Still it was a really fun race, great course and well organized. There are always lots of great athletes at the WSO events.   I still ended up running 6 miles that day. The other three were just at a much lower rate then I would have run in a race.  They weren't great quality miles, but I got the workout done and saved some energy for my Sunday triathlon. This race was a struggle, like many of my races this season.  My body still has not adjusted to the higher running miles I am putting in to get ready for New York. I have no excuse for the missed turn. This is the second time this season that has happened.  I think I am due for a good race.

************************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015i, Cozumel in 2016 and Denmark in 2018. In 2018 finishing 5th in the 60 to 64 age group.

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 215 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/



Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Cudahy Classic 5 Mile- No Good Deed



" Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not. Remember that what you have now was among the things you only hoped for'"- Epicurus

On Sunday July 30, I raced another Badgerland Strider running club event.  I am competing for a club championship for my age group. I needed the points so I had to run.

I didn't really want to when the alarm went off at 5:00 am. I was getting up so early because I had signed up to work packet pick-up at 6 am.  The race was scheduled to start at 7:30 due to the heat.

Two races would be run, the 5 mile which I was doing and a 10 mile which would run the 5 mile course twice.   I probably should have run the longer race since I am training for the NY marathon, but I need the championship points. I was sitting in first place but only by 50 points.

I was turned away from volunteering, because my name was not on the list. I was told I was welcome to help, but they had so many volunteers I did not think I was needed.

So I chatted and waited for the race to start.  I took a gel 30 minutes before the race, to perfectly time the energy I would need.  Right after I took the gel, the race announcer said the race start would be delayed for 20 minutes to let the bathroom lines clear. I was a bit annoyed, since I had gotten their early, took care of everything and was ready to go. The delay would throw off my race fueling.

My plan was to use the race as a tempo run, run the first mile as a warm-up, then tempo pace for the next three and finally ease up the last mile. That was the plan anyway.

I held back a bit the first mile, but when it was time to surge I had little energy. That means it was going to be a tough day. I would have to fight to finish the race.The marathon training is at the point where it is sapping my energy.  I would just have to do my best to hang on for the five miles.

Another woman that looked to be in my age group was right behind me. Several times I surged to get ahead, only to have her catch me.  I put on another surge and kept up the pace to put her away.  Fate had other plans. An older gentleman running just steps ahead of me fell hard. His sunglasses flew off, breaking as they hit the ground. He lost his baseball cap.

I remember when I fell during a race this spring. I would want someone to stop and help me. Another athlete and I stopped to help him. I gathered up his sunglasses and helped him to his feet. He was ok.  Other runners asked if he needed help. I called out he was fine. It took less than a minute, but I now saw two other women that looked to be in my age group pass me.

It took some effort, but I caught one, the same one that I had been battling with all race. With about 2 miles to go I was about out of gas. I put one last surge on, but could not shake her. In the last half mile she pulled beside me and said "let's finish together".  I told her to go on. I just did not have the will or the energy to match her pace. Before she left, she told me she was in my age group as was the other woman that passed me when I stopped to help the fallen runner.

When I checked the results, I finished 4th, just 9 seconds out of 3 rd and about 30 seconds out of 2nd. If I had been racing in the 55- 59 age group my finish time of 51:09 would have been good enough for 2nd place. I  moved up to the 60 to 64 age group just three weeks before.

It was disappointing to miss out on a medal by such a small margin, but stopping to help was the right thing. I would do it again and hope someday if I fall again, someone will do the same for me. It cost me 2nd place, but did not really affect my points for the club competition. My competitor finished in first.

I have come so far as a runner. I remember being yelled at in grade school for being slow. In this race I ran right with the top runners in my age group. I am grateful and proud that I put in such a good effort on a day when I was just not feeling up to a powerful race.  I always try to remember how many people with CMT would give anything to be able to run. So I remember them and proudly represent them in every race.  I got my points and I am hanging on to 2nd place in my age group in the club championship. What is really important is the start line and the finish line and I crossed them both. That is worth something!

*********************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015i, Cozumel in 2016 and Denmark in 2018. In 2018 finishing 5th in the 60 to 64 age group.

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 215 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA

Monday, July 30, 2018

Beer Garden 5 K- Lake Park Edition


"Sometimes it is the artist's task to find out how much music you can still make with what you have left." - Itzak Perlman

Thursday July 26th was the latest installment of a series of races in Milwaukee following the traveling beer garden.  Beer gardens were common in Milwaukee before Prohibition. They have now been brought back to the county parks. Some like the park across from my home are permanent. Others get a group of trailers and food trucks that make a six week visit to a location.  The race series have been following this beer caravan.

This one was in Lake Park along the shores of lake Michigan.  The park was designed by Fredrick Law Olmsted, the same architect that designed Central Park in New York City.

The park has a lawn bowling course, a high end restaurant, hiking trails, a water fall and lots of bike trails.  The weather was perfect for a race, 73 F with a light wind and no humidity.

I like to warm-up for my summer races with a short bike ride.  I am swimming and riding to cross train as I train for my New York marathon run in November.

I forgot my water bottle for my bike. I am not immune to making dumb mistakes like this. I would just have to rely on water fountains or as we call them bubblers along the bike path to get a drink.

The route for this race is similar to one run in June called the "Super Run" by the Badgerland Striders.   That race had almost 1000 runners. This race would be about 400 and it would be my first 5K in the 60 to 64 age group. I knew my chance to medal was excellent.

My plan for the race was to use it as one of my three training runs for the week. The plan called for 3 x 800 meter sprints with 400 meters of rest. I translated that into 6 minutes of effort with 4 minutes of rest.

Doing this  also gives me something to focus on during the race. I like to see how much I can push myself instead of doing just an easy cruise.  It is much more social to do a race, then to try and grind out a workout by myself. Plus there is a nice pint glass at the end with a cold Sprecher root beer.

I lined up in about the front 1/4 of the pack at the start. I have gotten tired of weaving through strollers, dog walkers and slower runners.  I had warm-up with a mile of running, so I was ready for my first interval as soon as the gun went off.  The first part and ending of the race are on grass. That is tricky for me due to the uneven ground. The sudden collapse of an ankle is real risk.

There is also a huge downhill in the first mile. I love hills and I hit the first mile at a 9:00 pace.  There is a nice flat section and a water stop. Then a giant up hill at St. Mary's hospital. I kept up my intervals and cruised.

I had some ankle pain. I think it is due to tight muscles now that I am doing longer runs for my marathon training. I made a mental note to start addressing that. I am already fighting a knee issue from doing races with long hills. My knee held up well.

I finished the third interval and was into my cool-down of 10 minutes when I got onto the grass to finish the race. The course Marshall said there were three men trying to catch me and I should hurry up. I yelled  "They are not in my age group".  One passed me and although I had not intended to speed up, I kicked it up a notch. Something just bothered me about some guy thinking he did not want me to beat them.  I held off the other two men.

I finished with a time of 30:53. which was good enough for 1st place in my age group. I would also have won the 55- 59, and placed third in the 50 to 54.  So it was a good day even though I went into the race a bit under hydrated.  I think as my training mileage increases I can bring that down a bit, especially if I drop a bit of weight.

The bonus was I ran into Wisconsin Senior Olympics (WSO) President John White and his wife Mary after the run. They were doing a yoga and nutrition event in the same park.  John was able to give me a copy of the Wisconsin Bike Federation magazine.  There was a spread on the WSO and some pictures of the athletes including me.  John has invited me to join the board and I will be inducted at the next meeting in August.  The fun, the challenge and friends keep me coming back to races.

*****************************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015i, Cozumel in 2016 and Denmark in 2018. In 2018 finishing 5th in the 60 to 64 age group.

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 214 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA

Sunday, July 29, 2018

Skillet Sunday-Crab Cakes





Crab Cakes

2 (6 ounce) cans crab meat
4 scallions chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons Old Bay seasoning
1/4 cup sour cream
4 tablespoons bread crumbs
2 eggs
1 tablespoon stone ground mustard
oil for frying (coconut oil)

Put the crab onto a medium mixing bowl. Add the scallions, seasoning,sour cream, bread crumbs, eggs. and mustard.  Mix well.  Shape into eight patties.  Place another cup of bread crumbs into a pie plate.
Put each patty one at a time into the bread crumbs. Press each patty to get the crumbs to adhere. Turn the patty over and coat the other side.  Place onto a plate and cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Heat oil in a cast iron frying pan to a depth of 1/4 inc. Add four of the patties, one at a time to the pan.  Fry on until the outside of each cake is brown on each side.  Heat the oven to 300 F and place the patties onto the sheet and into the oven. Keep warm the other patties are cooked.

Add the last four patties to the oven and bake for 20 minutes. Serve with a fresh squeeze of lemon juice or tartar sauce.

Make 8 patties

************************************


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  In 2012 she finished 2nd at Boston in the Mobility Impaired Division. She was on the course in 2013 when the bombs exploded.

She has appeared three times at the Paratriathlon National Triathlon Sprint Championship. She was the 2012 and 2014 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division Champion.

In 2014 she was the PC Open Champion at the Duathlon National Championship and at the Aqua bike National Championship in 2016. She represented Team USA at the Aquathon ITU World Championship in Chicago in 2015 and at the World championship in Cozumel in 2016.  

 In 2014 she represented the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.  She has won state championships in cycling and triathlon as a senior Olympian. In 2017 she placed 2nd in her age group at the Winter Triathlon National Championship, earning a spot on Team USA for the World Championship.

She travels around the country raising awareness of CMT.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete and the book “Soup Sundays, A Journey Toward Healthy Eating”.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 213 members in 39 states. We also have members in Australia, England, Scotland, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Iran, Norway and Sweden. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Follow CMT Author Chris Steinke
https://cmtandmesite.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/what-is-charcot-marie-tooth-disease/


Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, triathlete and CMT, Boston Marathon Bombing, CMT disease, CMT and exercise, exercise and CMT, CMT, athlete and CMT.Team CMT, CMT athlete, athlete and CMT, bike4CMT, walk4CMT,  CMTA, HNF, Tri4CMT, Walk4CMT, MDA