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Sunday, June 29, 2014

Salad Sunday- Quinoa Vegatable Salad



2 cups water
1 cup Quinoa

I cook my quinoa in my rice cooker. I coat it will olive oil and let the quinoa cook while I chop the vegetables. It can also be cooked in a saucepan. Add water and quinoa to a saucepan and cook on low until tender ( about 20 minutes). Set aside to cool.

1 cucumber
1 small zucchini
2 small carrots
1 medium Roma tomato
1 red bell pepper
2 stalks celery

Chop all of the vegetables into bite size pieces.

Dressing
2/3 cup vinegar
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup fresh basil leaves

Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high for 30 seconds. Add chopped vegetables to salad bowl. Add quinoa and add dressing.  Chill and then serve.  Makes six medium size servings

***********************
Author competing for Team USA PATCO 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team and was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT



Saturday, June 28, 2014

Superfood Saturday- Oat Bran with Cherries and Almonds



2 cups coconut milk
1 cup water
1 1/2 cups Oat Bran
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/4 cup honey
2 cups fresh or frozen tart cherries
2 tablespoons slivered almonds

In a sauce pan, bring milk water mixture to a boil over medium heat. Add oat bran and cook uncovered until the mixture begins to thicken, about 5- 10 minutes. Stir to keep mixture from sticking.

Add cherries, vanilla, and honey to mixture.  Remove from heat. Serve with milk and almonds

Makes 4 servings

Super foods: Oat bran and cherries.

***********

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team and was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT



*********************


Thursday, June 26, 2014

Denied a Seat at the Table?


I've been at a conference all week in Florida. I was a keynote speaker yesterday at a procedure writer conference.

Public speaking comes really easily to me and the talk was well received. The time flew by.

I think it may be the high point for my week. I am due in Chicago at 8 am tomorrow for my para triathlon classification appointment.  That means a 4 am wake up call to get on the road early to miss rush hour traffic.

I get in later this evening and I don't think I will sleep much. I have been denied classification twice. Those of us for the most part with CMT have not been able to get in. I am told that I am clearly impaired but do not meet the standard.  I was not even given the respect of a proper assessment. The assessor went through the motions. I was treated like a scammer.  It was humiliating.

I could accept I was too strong or not impaired enough if I thought the assessment was evenly applied.
The standards let those with MS in that can run a 21 min 5K leg of the triathlon, but I am told I am too strong. I have never gotten a good answer from ITU officials on why those of us with CMT have not gotten in.

This year a new classification system is being rolled out. I don't have much hope since the ITU did not seem interested in talking with any of the experts that volunteered to help design the new system.

What happens tomorrow matters to me. When I was in Dallas at the swim start for the para race. One of the visually impaired athletes was texting on her phone. With 56 year old eyes I sometimes have trouble reading the text on a text message, yet this athlete met the minimum impairment.  Apparently she has depth perception issues. I am not disputing her challenges or her right to compete, just do not understand why the very real challenges I face as an athlete have not been accepted.

It matters to me. Unlike some with CMT I have trained extremely hard all off season to be ready to compete at an elite level. I am competitive and meet the national standards for entry into the national championship. I've won para races and not just because I was the only athlete. I have the drive, discipline and desire to be competitive.

I can be competitive at the para-triathlon and para-duathlon levels nationally. Although there is a big gap between me any athletes from other countries, I was ready to work hard to close that gap. I train 2 hours a day under the direction of a professional coach. I am race ready, but will I be allowed to compete?

After tomorrow I will know whether I will have that chance. I can compete as an age group athlete. I did make the national team as an age group duathlete. At the para level I have a chance to be among the best in the world. I am not content or happy to just be competing.

It is not enough for me. I have been a competitive runner for years. I am not just happy to be competing or to be active.  I want the chance to compete against athletes with similar challenges. That is why para-sports exist. If you are going to have a neuro-muscular category then why deny those of us with CMT that fit into this group. There as many people with CMT in the US as there are with MS.  You are denying access at this this far to those that should be let into competition.

Plus I feel as though I am standing up for every athlete with CMT. We deserve the respect to be classified into competition. We deserve that respect as athletes. We deserve to have our challenges recognized.

So I have no idea how things will go, I am not hopeful. But I will know  very soon.  My race plans for 2014 depend on the outcome.

******************

Sunday, June 22, 2014

End Swim Congestion



"If you ship does not come in, swim out to meet it." - Jonathan Winters, Actor and Comedian

If you are at all serious about doing well as a triathlete, you have to practice swimming, running and biking under race type conditions.

That means swimming in open water in a lake, ocean or the case here in the Midwest, one of the Great Lakes.

I swim as part of a training group every Monday night at an inland lake in Pewaukee, Wisconsin. I've heard several athletes complain about being congested after the swim. I also had a slight case of my sinuses being blocked.

I did not think much about it until I did the Age Group National Sprint Championship in Milwaukee last August. The swim course was in Lake Michigan in the harbor here in Milwaukee.  I did the practice swim on Friday afternoon and the sprint race on Sunday morning.

By Sunday evening,  my sinuses were so stuffed up it was uncomfortable. It was a little tough to breath and I had a bad sinus headache. I asked my coach what to do about it and she recommended this product; Sovereign Silver.    Sovereign Silver Immune Support is made by Natural Immunogenics. It a solution of Silver Hydrosol. It comes in a mister bottle. It contains charged silver particles.

To use it, I spray a bit in each nostril before and after I swim.  I no longer get any congestion from swimming. I am still swimming in inland lakes. I also did the Chicago Triathlon last August with no problem. I would not swim without it in open water.

It is available on Amazon. A 2.7 ounce bottle retails for $13.00.
I've seen discussion on Amazon about using this for skin conditions and cuts as well.

***********************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team and was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. as a paratriathlete at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT



Friday, June 20, 2014

Minding the Gap




"Don't measure yourself by what you have accomplished, but by what you should have accomplished with your ability."- John Wooden

I've been to London a number of times. as the doors close on the sub-way car, a voice tells you to mind the gap.  I still have the key chain I bought years ago with the saying.  It's good advise to watch the gap between the car and the platform as the door closes.

I'm well aware of gaps, at least gaps in athletic performance. The past two years I've done an indoor bike class. I do it to improve my biking so I can be competitive as a para-triathlete.  Our bikes (compu-trainers) are hooked up to TV's in the front of the room, so you can see not just your progress on the course we are riding but everyone else. For most of the class I was the slowest in the class by allot. The gap was huge.

But slowly and with lots of hard work I have closed the gap quite a bit. The last few weeks of class I was no longer the slowest athlete.  I actually was faster than two of the guys in the class.

Last weekend I did a brick workout with my coaches training group.  We biked on trainers next to a track and then did laps after riding the bike. We repeated a the bike/ run cycle a number of times. I cannot tell you how many times I was lapped by all the other athletes. The gap was huge and I minded. It bothers me a lot.  I hate always being the slowest one.  It reminds me of grade school gym class.

In an email my coach sent to all her athletes a few weeks ago she told all of us not to compare ourselves to anyone else. We should just worry about our performance. I know she is right but I can't help myself. I'm an engineer and we live by numbers.  She told me today not to compare myself to the other women. I cannot help it. It is what I do as an athlete. I want to be the best and right now the gap between me and the top women is huge. It seems insurmountable.

At the National Championship last year, even if I had classified in the National Champion would have beat me by 4 minutes. The gap used to be 30 seconds. I have been working all winter to bridge that  4 minute gap. So minding the gap in this case has motivated me to workout.  When I don't feel like working out I ask myself what the champ is doing. I always say... I bet she is swimming laps, or biking or running... whatever I am supposed to be doing. So minding the gap has motivated me. At a tri in Verona in February I improved more than that 4 minutes on my bike alone. So by minding the gap, I closed the gap.  I thought I was on track for Nationals in September.

Now a new gap has appeared.  At PATCO in Dallas the best para-triathletes in North and South America competed and I was totally out of my league. There are women in my class that can do a triathlon in 1 hr 25 minutes. I was hoping to get to 1 hr 35 minutes this year. I don't think I can ever close this gap and I am discouraged.  The athletes competing now are so good and my chances at a paratriathlon National Championship do not look bright even if I now classify in under the new system.

So I am a little discouraged and I shared this with my coach today in our bi-weekly meeting.  It is no fun to once again find myself in the position with a large gap to close.  I am not sure I can do it this time. All the hard work I am going to put in may not be enough and I am struggling a bit with my motivation. It seems so out of reach.

But my coach asked me what I was doing all this. I did want to win a National Championship. But what started all of this was my love of competition. I knew long distance running was getting more difficult so I started the switch to triathlon so I could keep competing. I still have that. I compete because it motivates me to keep working out. Working out is my best bet for keeping as much function as long as possible with CMT.

So even though it may not be fun getting beat by so much I will line up in the ITU race next weekend in Chicago. I don't know yet if it will be the elite race because I made classification or in the Physically Challenged Open Division.  I have to remind myself I am doing this to raise awareness.of CMT.  My dream was to make the US Team for Rio in 2016.  A goal that seemed possible only a short time ago, is now slowly slipping away as the performance gap between me and the other athletes grows and I mind very much. But I have to remember even though Rio may be gone, there is a lot left for me in this sport.

I know also I have to be patient, that I am doing really well for an athlete with CMT. It is just that I also remember the athlete I used to be. I used to be able to do a 21 minute 5 K.  It now takes me 29 minutes on a good day. Another big gap and I mind.

So I have some work to do to get myself mentally adjusted. I still have para-duation if I classify in. There is still the Senior Olympics. Age group events are still there. After all I qualifed as an age group athlete in duathlon. There is lots out there for me as a CMT affected athlete. I know how much fun triathlons can be.  So I have a bit of a mental gap to bridge. Don't worry I will get there. I'm staying calm and minding the gap!


***********
Wodke competing at the PATCO race in Dallas for Team USA 1014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. And was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT





Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Product Review- Recovery Socks

ec3d Compression Recovery Socks

One of the fun things about a big race whether a triathlon or marathon is the visiting the vendor expos. Sometimes the vendor's give away samples or product.

I worked as a volunteer at the  USAT Age Group  Triathlon Nationals here in Milwaukee.

I worked at packet pick up and several of the runners told me about a vendor giving away compression socks.

I use compression socks everytime I do any run of 10K or more. Also hearing free....well that's for me.

The socks were free for all athletes particpating in the weekend races. Since I was doing the sprint race on Sunday I made sure I got over to the vendor booth to score my free pair.

I put them away because I have so many pairs of compression socks already.  About a month ago I was looking at the package and noticed these were not comperssion socks for performance. They were compression socks for recovery.

I had heard of leaving on recovery socks or tights after a long run to help with getting the waste products and lactic acid ouf of the body.

On the packaging the vendor makes the following claims:

  • excellent arch support
  • Calibrated and graduated compression 25-30 mmHG
  • Superior compression zone on the shin and calf.
  • Reduces soreness and inflamation
  • Reduced recovery time.
I wore them twice now after a 16 mile and a 20 mile run.  I have really high arches and they do provide great arch support. The socks themselves are really comfortable. I did notice my legs felt much better the next day then they usually do after a long run.

The socks are open toe and I wear them with sandals making them really comforatable.  
Love this product and they seem to do all as advertised.

They are available on Amazon for $59.99

*********************************
Author on left at Boston 2013 Finish Line


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. She will compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 145 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT


Sunday, June 15, 2014

No Food for a Week


"Everything you want is just outside of your comfort zone."- Robert Allen, Co-author, The One Minute Millionaire

I didn't post a Super Food recipe yesterday and no Salad Sunday recipe today. I plan my meals ahead of time and cook my food for the week on Saturday and Sunday. There was no need to cook this week because I'm not going to eat this week.  I'll be doing a  7 day intense detox program.

I've heard about other athletes doing detox programs so I have been curious about it.  I've heard claims of weight loss and increase in performance.

My chiropractor at Oak Creek Health & Wellness suggested I get tested and get on a performance nutrition program.

The process started with a BioImpedence Analysis to assess my health. I had a body fat measurement of 19.5 % which is good for a female.  Overall I was healthy but he suggested the detox because we all have environmental toxins in our body. The toxins come from pesticides, chemicals and pharmaceuticals in our air, water and food. These toxins can interfere with our bodies ability to function well.  The fatigue so many of us experience may be due to toxins. Many of our diseases like diabetes may be due to poor nutrition and inflammation of our body systems.  Processed foods can contain lots of chemicals.

So the first step is a detox and then I will start a nutrition program to help me with athletic performance.

Here is what I will be doing:

Vegetables
This is the only food I am allowed to eat and I am not the biggest fan of green vegetables. I can eat unlimited amounts a  day of  one of the following: broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, spinach, peas, green beans, avocado, any green leafy vegetables ( kale, spinach, lettuce, etc.), brussels sprouts, green pepper, cucumber, snow peas, or zucchini.

Ultra Clear
At least three servings of this a day and can have as many servings as I want.  This is mixed with water and can be mixed with this.

I also get unlimited amounts of this and is suggested if having hunger pangs.

I rub this into the bottom of my feet at night before I sleep and in the morning.
This is done to increase the glutathione levels.

Water
8 glasses a day of filtered water at a minimum.  So I will be drinking lots of water.  I also bought a Brita water filter pitcher to help with this.
 2 of these a day, 3 times per day.
Two of these three times per day.

So looks like my meals will be pills and my drinks. I waited to start this so I could have a few good meals and clean all the fruit and food out of my refrigerator this weekend.  I have been really bad food wise. I figured since I was going to do a de-tox I would make it worthwhile. I had guacamole and chips for dinner on Friday and pizza and garlic bread for several of the rest of my meals. So I am ready to start tomorrow. Will let you know how it goes. I think it is going to be strange not to eat much.  I think this is going to be way out of my comfort zone, but I think it is going to be a good step. With my CMT I want to take good care of my body. I put lots of demands on it as an athlete. Also since there are no treatments for CMT, exercise and nutrition are the only tools I have right now to manage my condition.


***********************************
Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. And was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT

Saturday, June 14, 2014

My New Triathlon Car

2004 Saturn Vue

I had to go car shopping. I had no choice. My beloved Saturn Vue was rear-ended about two weeks ago.
I knew with it being 10 years old with 152,000 miles the insurance company would not want to fix it. They totaled out the car. My old friend was gone and I needed to find a replacement.
So it was time to shop to find another car that would work as well for me as my Saturn.
I had a couple of requirements:
·        My triathlon bike had to fit in the back of the car without taking off the front wheel.
·        I had to be able to add a kayak rack to the roof.
·        Dark interior that was the one thing I did not like about my last car. I loved the emerald green exterior color, but hated the beige interior since it showed dirt and every scuff mark from taking my bike in and out of the car.
·        Option for a sunroof.
·        Good gas mileage, at least 29 mph highway ( that is what the Saturn got)
·        Total cost under $30,000 since I would be paying cash.
·        Larger size car for protection in an accident. After being in more than one rear end accident I am pretty sensitive to this. I have been hit twice will sitting at stop lights and once while waiting at a stop sign at a freeway exit ramp.
A couple of nice to have but not required:
·        Manual transmission. I am one of the few people I know that really likes driving a manual transmission. Plus I think they give some control in icy or snowy conditions.
·        Backup camera
·        Navigation system
·        Nice interior
Because my car was 10 years old, I had been giving some thought to my next car. So here are a couple of cars I looked at but did not test drive. I did some car dealership visits on a Sunday when they were closed to look around.

Nissan Xterra:  I get my service done at the Nissan dealer because they took over Saturn service. I love the look of this car; it was in my price range and has an internal bike rack. This one failed on gas mileage with 21 mph highway.

Ford Escape: I love the older Escape SUV and had considered this car. I saw the new escape when renting a car from the Ford dealership. It is too small in the back to fit my bike and looks now like a mini crossover and not an SUV.

Ford Edge:  I really wanted an SUV because I do occasionally drive on dirt roads when I camp or go to Northern Wisconsin.  This one is too much a crossover and was outside of my $30,000 price range.

RAV 4- I rented one of these in St. Croix a couple of years ago.  It is a nice fun car, but too small to fit my triathlon bike.

Jeep Compass- This car met most of my requirements, but I did not like the look of the front of the car, so it got the boot.
I ended up test driving a Subaru Outback, Subaru Forester, Chevy Captiva, and Chery Equinox.

Subaru Outback- I love the look of this car even though it is technically a station wagon. It many of my requirements.  They offer a nice discount for National Ski Patrol members. Because I am a member I have been seeing my fellow patrollers drive this car for years. It also is not as high as an SUV which would make getting my kayak on and off easier. I was prepared to fall in love with this car.  It has plenty of room in the back for all my camping gear, skis and triathlon bike.  I did a test drive and was really disappointed. The engine was really noisy and I could hear all the road noise.  The interior was also not very nice and honestly looked a bit cheap compared to other cars. On the plus side there is an option for a manual transmission. The car was fun to drive and handled well.  We took it on a road full of potholes and you could not even feel the holes when you went over them. 

Subaru Forester- I drove this model with a manual transmission and sunroof. The sun roof was huge and let in lots of light.  The stick for the manual was really spindly and I did not like that.  The car handled well and was much quieter than the Outback. It had the same problems with the interior and I did not like the look of the exterior all that much.  Plus if I wanted a dark interior and a sunroof I was limited to white, grey or silver for the exterior color.

Chevy Captiva-   This is really a 09 Saturn in disguise.  It has a Daewoo engine, and some upgrades. I loved the look of this car because it is so similar to the newer Saturn’s.  It is only available new as a fleet car, but quite a few are on the used market. They are used mostly by rental car companies. I found a used one in Iowa that was red with leather seats, a sunroof and 8000 miles on it. It would only be $200 to transfer it to Milwaukee. So I found a dealership in the Dallas area with similar equipment to test drive.
There had been some complaints on line of engine problems and when I test drove it I could see why. It is a four speed automatic transmission. When I drove it the engine really seemed to rev up to high rpm’s before it shifted.  I always shifted based on engine sound and would have shifted well before the automatic transmission did. I was concerned about wear on the engine from the late shifting. The car was fun to drive, handled well and the interior was great. Lots of room in the back for all my stuff. I would say it ended up number two to the car I did buy.

Chevy Equinox
I see these cars everywhere.  When I started looking I asked one of my friends how she liked hers. She had driven Subaru’s for years and recently bought an Equinox. She liked both, but had a better service experience with Equinox.
This car met all my requirements and most of my nice to have features. The interior looked nice. It was very quiet to drive and with a 6 speed auto transmission it shifts well. It also has a manual transmission option on the console. I will have to try that soon. It handled well and can be taken on dirt roads as long as the drive is not too technical. I am not looking to off road with it.
It has tons of room in the back for my triathlon stuff and has an option for a kayak rack.   I got a model with a back-up camera and sunroof. I picked the ruby red exterior with black interior.  I think it is a nice looking car.  Not as pretty as my emerald green Saturn Vie but close.
It gets a best in class 32 mph per gallon highway. It is equipped with OnStar so I have turn by turn navigation through them. The car has road side assistance for 3 years.
GM was offering the best incentives.  My brother was able to negotiate a deal for me from Texas over the phone. All I had to do was go to the dealership and pick it up.

My New Tri Car
It is not love at first site, but I am hoping I will learn to love my new car as much as my Saturn. It certainly is nice to have a new car and not be worried about being stranded somewhere when I drive to a triathlon out of town.  Looking forward to lots of new adventures in my new car! So my new triathlon car is the Chevy Equinox.  I've even had a chance to load some gear in it for a tri workout.
I had my bike trainer and my training bike loaded in the back for my workout on Saturday and there was still enough room for my workout bag.

*****************
Competing for Team USA at PATCO June 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. And was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT


Sunday, June 8, 2014

Salad Sunday- Tuna & Bean Salad


Beans are cheap, low fat and full of fiber.  They are also versatile since they come in a number of different varieties. Using canned beans makes them easy to add to recipes.  This weeks salad will be my lunch all week. I have been eating soup or salad for lunch to reduce the bread I eat. This recipe goes together really quick too and serving over salad gets some more veggies in my diet. If you like you can serve it on toast.

2 ( 5 ounce ) cans tuna drained
1 (15 ounce) can Great Northern Beans drained and rinsed
½ cup miracle whip
½ cup chopped white onion
2 tablespoons fresh parsley chopped
2 tablespoons fresh dill chopped
¼ cup sunflower seeds
1 carton grape tomatoes, cut in half

Combine tuna, beans, onion and miracle whip. Mix gently.  Add herbs, sunflower seeds and tomatoes.  Serve over a bed of baby kale, baby spinach or a bed of mixed spring greens mixed with kale.

Serves 4-6


Adapted from Frugal Cooking with Beans by Sally Thomas

It is available on Amazon as a Kindle edition.  Go to Amazon to take a look at other recipes.


***********************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a three time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team.and was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Super Food Saturday- Cheaper Greek Yogurt



Greek yogurt is a great super food but I think it is super expensive.  A 32 ounce carton of Greek yogurt costs anywhere from $4.99 to $5.99.   The price for a carton of regular sugar free yogurt cost about $2.39.


The difference between the two is the Greek yogurt goes through an extra straining process to remove the excess liquid leaving a thicker product.

I do the straining at home and it is really simple. Use a cheese cloth or a coffee filter in a strainer over bowl or measuring cup.  I use a coffee filter because it fits perfectly in the strainer.



You can leave over night in the refrigerator, but it is mostly drained after just a couple of hours.

It leaves a nice thick product. I had some this morning with fresh raspberries.  A super
food that is super easy!

Greek Yogurt with fresh berrues!


Greek Yogurt is great for cooking and baking.  The Greek Yogurt Cookbook, by Lauren Kelly, CN has great recipes for using yogurt. 

  She had this great chart for substituting healthy yogurt for less healthy products.

1 cup butter = ¼ cup Greek yogurt + 1 cup butter
1 cup oil = ¾ cup Greek yogurt
1 cup sour cream = 1 cup Greek yogurt
1 cup mayonnaise = 1 cup Greek yogurt
1 cup cream cheese = 1 cup Greek yogurt
1 cup buttermilk = use liquid drained off of yogurt or 2/3 cup Greek yogurt + 1/3 cup milk
1 cup heavy cream = 2 cup Greek yogurt + ½ cup heavy cream
1 cup crème fraise = 1 cup Greek yogurt

When I buy my yogurt, I select a plain one with no added sugar. I look for one with active cultures made with low fat milk.

Some of the benefits of Greek yogurt include:
  • High in protein, a typical cup has 15- 20 grams of protein which is the amount of 3 eggs.
  • High in calcium which keeps bones and teeth strong. Calcium helps heart and nerves functioning well.
  • Live yogurt cultures in yogurt called probiotics keep your digestive system healthy.


If you want a bit of sweetness when you eat Greek yogurt, add a bit of honey or maple syrup. Much healthier than sugar and really tasty!

***********************

Author at PATCO Dallas 2014

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. And was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT


Thursday, June 5, 2014

Days Like This- PATCO Report

PATCO Race Dallas 
"Mama said There'll be days like this."- Song Mama Said by Luther Dixon and Willie Denson

This race started to go bad the night before. There was supposed to be a pre-race meeting at 6 pm the night before the race. I thought that was late since most athletes want to turn in early to get a good night’s sleep.
I got to the meeting 30 minutes early only to find a U.S. team meeting going on that I knew nothing about. I had asked the team managers to send all e-mail to my outside email account, since I would be out of the office the week prior to the race. They forgot and I found the email in my work in-box when I got back to work.  I got my uniform and participated in the team picture. 

We waited and waited for the ITU officials running the race to show up. When they arrived we had to check in and present ID. The meeting finally started at 7:30 p.m. over 1.5 hours late.  They went over the course and some of the basic rules.  One of the Brazilian team members was confused by the bike course and was asking about it over and over. I hear athletes mumbling about needing to get to bed.  The meeting let out at 9 pm and then we had to stand in a line again to get our race packet.

My family had brought me to the meeting and had been sitting and waiting for hours. None of us had eaten dinner so we stopped at a local wing place on the way home. It was now 10 pm.  I was tired and hungry.  As soon as I ate my stomach felt un-well. I would be up all night from food poisoning.

I seriously thought about not going to the race. I emailed my coach to discuss what to do, but she did not answer back. I emailed the two team managers to let them know I was sick in case I had to drop out of the race at any point.  I could barely function I was so nauseous. I put one of my tri tats on upside down. Not a good start. Another I could not get to work.

The uniforms are so tiny and do not stretch much. I had to lie on the floor so I could pull it up over my hips. Taking if off and putting it back on to go to the bathroom was a major project. I heard one of the other women athletes say she did the same thing and had to use body glide.

We left early so we could stop and get some medicine. I threw up in the car trying to take it.
Once I got to the race site, it was another hour of standing in line to check-in. The officials decided all hand cycles should go first. I was in the first wave, but no problem since I had plenty of time. I saw one of the team managers and she asked how I was doing. I said “Not good”, but I was going to give it my best shot.
Once I got checked in I went to transition to set up. Transition was in an underground parking garage.  I had some trouble finding my rack number. There was a nice sign with my last name and number.

It was already hot and humid in Dallas and I went up to the swim start to sit in the shade. My brother, niece and sister-in-law found me. They had been out to breakfast while I was standing in the checkout line.  I sat just trying to conserve energy.  I did not do the pre-race swim. I put on my wet suit just 5 minutes before the start.
I got in just briefly to stay cool and take a few swim strokes.  My sister-in law asked about the race course since you could barely see the turn buoy. It was so far away. Not many markers either, but an easy course to swim.  It was 300 meters straight out, a right turn with 100 meters and back to shore and the exit.

Swim
The swim was an in water start, one hand on the concrete wall behind us.  Both men and women in two of the six paratriathlon categories would start together.  I’ve only once started with men and women in a really small triathlon. This was the biggest wave since I did age group nationals. We were off with the sound of the air horn and I forgot to start my watch.
Lots of churning, but no aggressive behavior. Glad I had the experience of swimming in a big group at age group Nationals.

Sometimes if I don’t sleep the night before a race, I just hope the training kicks in. That happened in Boston, my legs just remembered the training and took over.  That was not going to happen in this race. The swim was a physical struggle the entire time. I was so tired I had to tread water to rest. I did the side stroke several times and even did a couple of back strokes. Quitting was not an option. It seemed like it was taking me forever. I just kept repeating my swim mantra to keep myself mentally focused.
I made it to the steps, but my legs did not want to hold me up. I had volunteer help climbing every step.

T1
I had trouble getting my wetsuit off over my timing chip and fumbled getting on my bike shoes. I sat on the garage floor to put on my shoes; I noticed my knees were black from the garage floor.

Bike
It was a two loop course. The volunteers all along the course were great in pointing out where I needed to turn.  It was really windy and I could feel I had no energy in my thighs. Near the end I checked my average speed and it was 15.4 mph, well below my normal 17 mph for a race.   My bike computer said the course was 13.6 miles. I saw my niece Courtney and gave her a smile so at least the picture will look good. I remember lots of riders passing me.

T2
This went smoother, but I noticed as I ran out I had forgot to remove my bike gloves.  I took them off and was not looking forward to carrying them for the next 3 miles. I saw my brother in the crowd and flipped them to him, hoping I would not be penalized.

Run
When I get to this point I always know I am going to finish the race. This was two loops.  The end of the first loop was near the finish. I hate having to go out and do one more loop when the finish is in sight.
I was struggling but if I kept a moderate pace I could hold on. I saw the team manager and she was cheering for all of the U.S. team members. As I passed I said I felt horrible. She said something about personal victory. That is what it was going to be. It would be a victory to just hold on and finish. Again saw my niece snapping lots of pictures. She got some great shots and I will not need to buy the pro pictures.

Again great volunteers on the run course. One aid station served both sides of the looped course. Volunteers would ask if I wanted water and meet me with it. One woman had seen me douse myself with water and volunteered to pour it over me.  At every station it was two cups on me and one in me. It was so hot and humid. I heard one male athlete collapsed right before the finish and another out on the course.  I crossed the finish line in 1 hr 52, my worst time ever, but I finished.  Too bad they ran out of finisher medals and I did not get one. They looked nice.


I had a really bad race at a time when every race counts. I wanted to race well and I did not do that. It was not about where I finished but about putting out my best possible effort and having a good time. I was not able to do either. But I did do the race and I finished.  There was a time when I would have stayed in bed or bailed out on the swim.  On a day when I was sick I was able to gut it out and finish. There is a personal victory in that. Now on to ITU Chicago and I hope I will be able to represent Team USA there as well.

*****************

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Chris is a triathlete and long distance runner. She is a two time participant of the Boston Marathon.  She was the 2012 National Champion Paratriathlon Open Division. In 2013 she qualified as a member of the Team USA Duathlon Team. And was eligible to compete in 2014 at the Age Group World Duathlon Sprint Championship in Pontevedre Spain.  She chose instead to represent the U.S. at the Pan-American Triathlon Championship in Dallas, Texas whre she finished 4th.

She is the author of the book, “Running for My Life” that details her experience as a CMT affected athlete.

You may visit her author page at:
http://www.amazon.com/Christine-Wodke/e/B00IJ02HX6


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have 150 members in 29 states. We also have members in Australia, Canada, Vietnam, Turkey, Finland and Iran. If you wish to join us visit our web site; www.run4cmt.com or www.hnf-cure.org


CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Additional Link
Follow CMT affected Paratriathlete Timmy Dixon
http://cmtamputee.wordpress.com/

Keywords: Running, Running and CMT, triathlon, triathlon and CMT, athlete and CMT, cycling and CMT, paratriathlon, challenged athlete, Team CMT, Running for My Life-Winning for CMT. Hereditary Neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth.
CMT and running, CMT and triathlon, CMT and athlete, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and running, Charcot-Marie-Tooth and triathlon, Team USA and Team CMT, Running for my life-Winning for CMT