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Monday, November 28, 2011

Team CMT Race News


Dawn Fritzell
It was a great weekend for racing for Team CMT. Dawn Fritzell wins the award for the most races. On Thusday she did a 5 mile Turkey Trot in Appleton and then turned around a few days later and did the Noodleini 15 K in DePere.  She did the Turkey Trot in 41:00 minutes and the 15K  in 1:21.  She said not bad for an old lady. Dawn you looked great too. Dawn is talking about getting her kids involved in a future race.  Looking forward to seeing them race!



Lincoln Stultz finishes his first 10K


Team CMT had a big showing at the Elf Run in Oconomowoc on Sunday November 27th. Lincoln Stultz shown here finishing his first 10K in a time of 1:02, good for 6th in his age group.  Mom Kathy was right behind and the whole family was there to cheer and take pictures. Lincoln runs for his sister Reagan who has CMT. So cool of you Lincoln. Way to go guys. We're proud of you.


Robert Kearney, Cheryl Monnat, Lincoln Stultz, Kathy Stultz, Chris Wodke

Other Team CMT members on hand at the finish to cheer on Kathy and Lincoln were Robert Kearney, Cheryl Monnat and Chris Wodke. Cheryl took 1st place in her age group with a time of 51:52 and Chris took 6th with a ttime of 59:19.  Not bad after finishing a marathon less than a month ago.

Team CMT member Kim Petak ran for Performance Outfitters and took 1st place in her age group with a time of 23:24 and Bill Devlin finish 7th in his age group with a time of 46:56.  I love the RACC winter series because they give medals for the first 10 places.  This was a fast and flat course. Although it was windy and 36F, it was much better than the 20F and windy we had last year.  The RACC puts on a great race series. 

Not to forget our friends in Texas. Team CMT member Morgan Johnson and Joyce Kelly both did an 8 mile Turkey Trot run this weekend in the Dallas area.  Next up for Joyce is the White Rock Half Marathon this weekend. You all in Texas Rock!  Good Luck this weekend Joyce!!!

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager
http://www.run4cmt.com/

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Post Marathon Recovery- Part 1 Race Day

" No matter what hurts at the beginning, by the end of the race something else will hurt worse."- Bob O'Connor

The average runner to finishing a marathon is going to feel some pain race day and for at least a few days after.  There are steps you can take before, during and after the race to minimize discomfort and speed your recovery.  Take these steps to help you feel your best during and after your race;

TrainingThe more prepared you are for your marathon or other long distance race the less sore you will be during and after the race.  Have at least 3 long runs of at least 20 miles on your training plan.   Your training plan should also include speed work, tempo runs and strength training to build endurance. Short your trainig and you will be very sore race day and for days after if you even finish the race. Also practice eating and drinking what you plan to consume on race day. You want to be sure your food intake is well tolerated and can be done smoothly.

Specific Training
Find out what type of course you will be running. If it is hilly you need to train for hills. If there are long downhill stretches you need to add down hill running to your training. Knowing what is on the course will also help you mentally prepare.  I know for instance that the first 10 miles of the Boston Marathon are on a down hill incline. The next 10 miles are rolling hills, with the big hill known as heartbreak hill at mile 21. I have adjusted my training program to include hills and running down hill so I am ready for Boston this April.

Race
Go out easy and stay within your planned pace so you don't over do in the last miles. Stay hydrated with water and sports drink. Also eat food offered on the course or supplment with sport gels and bars.  This replaces electrolyes and other nutrients to help get through the race and set you up for recovery.

Finish
Keep walking as you cross the finish line to keep your blood moving.  Sitting down can cause the blood to pool in your legs increating soreness.  Be sure you walk at least 10 -15 minutes each hour if you can tolerate it. A little later try elevating your legs by proping them up against a wall for 10 minutes. This helps to return blood out of your legs.

Food
You just ran 26.2 miles and you need to re-fuel even if you are not hungry.  Take the food offered at the finish. Many races now are offering food designed to spur recovery.  Grab a bottle of water to help you rehydrate. Drink milk if offered since it has been shown to help with muscle recovery.  Take in some sports drink throughout the day since this will help to replace the carbohydrates, protein and sodium you lost through the race.

Injuries
If you limped into the finish, address any injuries with rest, ice, and elevation. Do not get a massage if you have an injury or at least be careful about massage in that area.  If you came through healthy a massage can be a good idea if you wait at least a couple of hours. Doing it sooner can create more soreness.

Stretching
If you can't get a massage, at least do a good stretch with a roller stick or foam roller.  Stretch slowly and don't force anything. Stay out of the hot tub since heat will aggravate any injuries and impede recovery.

These are just a few of the steps you take the day of the race. In my next post I will talk about some plans for the weeks following your long distance race to get you back running and ready to race again.

Chris Wodke
Team Manager Team CMT
http://www.run4cmt.com/

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

What I'm thankful for



"Nothing can stop the man with the right attitude from achieveing his goal, nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong attitude."  Thomas Jefferson

Running long distance like reaching a goal is largely mental. If you think you can't finish a race or reach a goal you probably won't.  Happiness is largely due to mind set as well. It is amazing how happy you can be when you cultivate an attitude of gratitude.   I know I think about all the things I am grateful for every night as I am falling asleep. Thanksgiving seemed like a good day to share some of them;
  • I'm thankful that despite my CMT, I'm still running and enjoying it. My diagnois has given me a new purpose and joy in my running and I am grateful for it.
  • I'm thankful for my fellow Team CMT members. I can't believe we started with 3 members only 6 months ago.  There are now 61 of us spread out in 16 states and England.  Race by race and event by event you are all making a difference. Still hoping to reach 100 members by this time next year.
  • I am thankful for facebook, twitter, LinkedIn and the internet. It has helped me connect with so many of you on the team, learn your story and share it with others. Your stories are so similar to mine, thanks for sharing them.
  • I'm grateful I am not the only long distance runner out there with CMT.  I had been told so many times people with CMT can't run or shouldn't run, I thought I had to be the only long distance runner out there with CMT. I happy to learn that I am not. Thanks Jude, Joyce and Richard for being an inspiration to me.  Joyce and Richard are both doing marathons this year, thanks for your courage and determination.Thanks triathletes Donna, Joyce and Jess for inspiring me.
  • I am grateful to the total strangers I recurited to be on Team CMT.  You joined just because I asked.  Thanks also for all the teammates running for family members. Not everyone has that support and it makes your willingness to help with our mission very special to all of us.
  • I'm thankful for team member Joyce Kelly. She helped me put together my application package and letter to the Boston Athletic association. I wouldn't be running in Boston next April without her help. And yes I am very grateful to have been accepted to run the Boston Marathon in April.
  • Thanks Joyce for making me do that tri in 106F heat in Denton,Texas while you watched and for thinking that I'm fast. Your comment gives me perspective. See you at Christmas for that half marathon in Allen.
  • I am grateful to the HNF for their interest and promise of financial support for our team. With their help we're going to take our team to the next level in raising awareness of CMT.
  • I'm thankful for teammates Cheryl Monnat and Robert Kearney.  They were at our first race. They will be my entourage in Boston and make sure I get to the starting line on time. Thanks for your unwavering friendship and support and thanks to Robert who has become a hard core runner.
I could go on an on because I have been truly blessed. I my list makes all of your realize things your grateful for in your life. Happy Thanksgiving.

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Team CMT Members run Philadelphia Events





Congradulations to Team CMT members Jude Burton and Charlie Norris. Jude finished the half marathon in 2:49 and Charlie ran the marathon in 4:06.  Both did well in this sold out event and raised a lot of awareness for CMT.   There were 9408 finishers in the half. I don't know the numbers yet for the full marathon.

Also pictured in Michael Falcone. Michael is Charlie's nephew and has CMT. Micheal is also on Team CMT an plays football. Charile used this event to raise money for the CMTA.

I often wonder if we are making a difference. Then this week I read a story in the book "Anyways" about a man who lived in southeastern France in the early 20th century.  He lived along in a barren area that had once had a great forest with it’s own villages.  His life was simple. He went out every day and planted trees.  Year after year for decades he planted trees.  The trees grew into a forest. The forest held the soil attracting other plants, then birds and animals.  Families returned and homes were built.  By the end of the man’s lifetime he had transformed the entire region.

I think that's what we're doing for CMT. Race by race, event by event we're raising awareness and money.  We may make changes in ways we'll never know.  Someone once made a donation to Children's Hospital in Philadelphia. Children's hospital paid for the genetic test that diagnosed my niece. Because of her diagnosis I discovered my own CMT.  Because of my diagnosis and started Team CMT. Charlie told me he is a doer, well so am I and so is everyone on Team CMT.  Jude and Charlie you did good work today.  I am so proud of you. We are all doing good work. I am so proud of all of you!

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Marine Corp Marathon Trip Report



" There will be days when I' don't know if I can run a marathon, there will be a life time knowing that I have."- unknown

I traveled with Team CMT teammate Cheryl Monnat to Washington D.C. the last weekend of October. Cheryl was running in the Marine Corp 10K and I was running the marathon.

I don't like big events and have avoided big races like Al's run here in Milwaukee.  But the event was predicted to draw 30,000 runners and 100,000 spectators. I couldn't resist the chance to raise awareness on such a big stage.  MCM has a reputation of being a well organized and fun race and they didn't disappoint. It is a relatively flat course that goes around the Capitol and the monuments. Crowd support was unbelievable. The water and food stops were well stocked and well organized. This race is also extremely popular. It filled in just 23 hours, so I was thankful to be there.

We arrived on Friday morning and went straight to the expo. Pick-up was smooth and easy,  a taste of how the whole event would be run.  The 10K course would start at the mall and run the last 6 miles of the marathon. The marathon started at the Pentagon and finished at the Iwo Jima Memorial.

The evening before the race we got to have dinner with Ruth and Richard Cook. It was great to meet this special couple and we felt like we were long time friends.   We had dinner at a sports bar where the University of West Virginia was playing. Every time they scored all the fans would sing the John Denver song, "Take me home country roads".  Every time I hear that song I am going to think of Ruth and Richard.

I had a great night sleep ( 6 hours) thanks to prescription sleeping pills.  I have only slept one other time before a half or full marathon.  I don't think a sleepless night before a marathon is uncommon, but think about running 26 miles on little or no sleep.  I had also been fighting a number of injuries int the weeks leading up to the race. I woke feeling great and after breakfast announced myself ready to go.

The morning was cold at 34F. The cold made my feed and hands were numb for the first 5 miles.  The race started with an osprey helicopter flyover, a prayer and words of encouragement from Drew Carey. Carey has become a long distance runner and ran MCM as his first. He fired the starting gun and we were off.  It took me nine minutes to get to the starting line.  When we crossed the Potomac to go into D.C. I could see the runners stretched out for miles.

I had decided to just have fun with this run since I already had the time I needed to qualify for Boston. I took a small disposable camera with me to take pictures along the route. I have to say this was the most fun I have ever had running a marathon. It was great to have pictures from along the course.

The crowd support was incredible. Marines manned all the water stops and in many spots cheered us on along the course. At the Lincoln memorial we ran through a tunnel of people, the road so narrow from the crowds, there was room across the course for only a couple of runners.  People were cheering "Go Team CMT".  I tear up just remembering it. 

I did get a little tired at mile 23 and walked for a mile, but felt good and finished in 4:57 ahead of lots of racers.  I got my finisher medal and met Cheryl. Luggage pick up was easy since you were assigned a numbered UPS truck and there was a slot in each truck corresponding to your race number. So typical of the outstanding logistics of the entire event.

The 10 K had a rough start. The bridge over the Potomac was icy and at least one runner fell.  Cheryl had a nice run. She finished in a little over 57 minutes just one week after a half marathon and about a month after her finish at Lakefront marathon.

The best part of the whole day was getting that finisher medal. A marine places the medal on the neck of each finisher. A great finish to a great day. If you want to run a well run big time race, think about Marine Corp. It will be an experience I will carry with me for a lifetime.

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Meet Team CMT member Kim Petak


Kim started running in 1981 just to keep the weight off.  After she trained for a 5 mile race, that really motivated her to want to do more races and has kept her interested in training all these years.  The running is nice for weight control and keeping fit and healthy, but for her the races are the frosting on the cake.  It’s what she really looks forward to, and what motivates her to train.
She is a mom of a 16 year old daughter Julie, and 12 year old son David.  Julie, is a senior at Muskego HS, and is a straight A student.  She’s on the cross country team, the ski race team, and does track.  Basically, one sport ends for her, she gets a couple weeks break and then it’s on to the next sport.  Ski racing will be starting up the beginning of December, and their team has gone to state for the past 5 or 6 years in a row.  It’s a very exciting event to watch.  They wear the race suits, just like the Olympics, and some of the kids are flying down the hills.  
David, who is a 7th grader at Lake Denoon Middle School and is on the cross country team, Chess Team at LDMS, and is in Boy Scouts.  He will be doing ski race team thru the Alpine Valley program called SWAT (Southwest Alpine Team) this year.  
Her  husband, Jeff, is a real estate agent with Realty Executives in Elm Grove. They met at a Badgerland Strider meeting in 1984 and got married in 1990.  They used to do races together and really enjoyed that, but about 5 years ago, Jeff went in for hip pain.  X-rays showed that his cartilage was wearing away, and doctors recommended he give up running.  So now, instead, he does a lot of bike rides, and has done some century rides, too.  He has logged close to 2,000 miles this year on the bike.
Kim is signed up for the Elf Run, and plans on doing the RACC series again this year.  It’s a great event – very well organized and good food.  She likes the notion of doing several races where you have to do well, for the prize at the end of all of them.  Kim ran a sub 4 hour marathon at Lakefront Marathon in Milwaukee this year, good enough to qualify for Boston. She also recently took 3rd place in her age group at the Lakefront Discovery run in Milwaukee in November.   She is a busy lady with lots of hobbiles including; downhill skiing, sewing, reading, doing things with my kids.
Kim works at We Energies and I recruited her after Team CMT's first race last year. She had won her age group in the 5K.  I had seen Kim's name for year as an age group winner in area races.  She also races for Performance Outfitters. We are glad to have Kim race for Team CMT. Welcome Kim!


Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

I knew I could run a marathon when....

"You must do the thing you think you cannot do."- Eleanor Roosevelt


Chris Wodke & Cheryl Monnat of Team CMT

I never grew up thinking I would run long distance.  I remember running relay races in grade school and being screamed at for being slow. Plus my knees were prepetually skinned from falls ( all due to the CMT).  Not a good start to a running career.

I was never athletic but always active. I played tag, football and baseball with my brothers.  We rode our bikes everywhere and as long as I didn't compare myself to anyone else I enjoyed being active.

I started running in college to become a better skier, an activity I still do every winter as a member of the Crystal Ridge Ski Patrol.  I started racing after college. I used to tag along with Team CMT member Cheryl Monnat to races. I never remember winning anything and being really slow, but it was fun.  We went often, even competing in a 10 K at Badger State Games.

The first time I won a medal was at a 5K race as part of a conference. It was a really really small race. I won my age group three years in a row and I was hooked.  I became friends with running coach John Herod and talked him into training me. He taught me how to do speed work and tempo runs. I would often place in my age group and even won the womens divison once of a 2 mile race. For the first time in my life I felt like an athlete.

One day as part of my long run, John asked me to run for an hour without my headphones. He said it was important as a runner that I listen to my body. I did it and liked it.  I thought if I can run for an hour without music, I can run a marathon.  I set my sights on running a marathon.  I completed my first marathon in 4 hours and I did it without headphones. Finishing that marathon made me feel like I could accomplish anything.   I've done 5 more and I have that same feelng of accomplishment everytime.  I know I'll get that same feeling again when I cross the finish line at Boston this April.

Finishing marathons has carried over into my whole life.  If I set a goal I know I am going to reach it, whether its running Boston, a project at work, or raising money for CMT.  Most goals are a lot easier than running a marathon without music.

So how did you know you were ready to run your first marathon?

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Team CMT member qualifies for Boston

"The finish line isn't given it's earned"-unknown

Today was a big day for Team CMT. Richard Cook completed the Richmond Marathon in  5hr:57 minutes. Fast enough to qualify him for the mobility impaired divison of the Boston Marathon in 2013.  Richard I look forward to cheering you on. Ruth Cook also completed the half marathon.

Their coach Katie Ayala also a Team CMT member ran with Richard.  Katie will be working on an event next year in Richmond to raise awareness and funds for Team CMT.    Richard has CMT and I known how hard he worked for this one. Ruth had been training for the marathon until she was in a car accident, so she did well finishing the half. I got to meet Richard and Ruth last month when I was in D.C. for the Marine Corp Marathon. I am so proud of both of you and glad you are on our team.

This was a great day to raise awareness for CMT.  There wre expected to be 17,000 runners in the three races run today.  There were racers from 48 states and 14 countries. Imagine how many spectators saw our Team CMT singlets! 

In addition to  our Team CMT members, Kim Fallon of the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation was running to raise money for CMT research. Her sister Allison Moore is founder of the HNF and organized a cheer section for the CMT runners and a post race party.  HNF has asked Team CMT to partner with them to raise money for CMT research. Look for more details in the near future.

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Boston Marathon Acceptance Letter

  

Dear Christine L. Wodke,

This is to notify you that your entry into the 116th Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2012 has been accepted, provided that the information you submitted is accurate.

A Confirmation of Acceptance card will be mailed to you via US Postal Service mail in October.

In early April 2012, an official Number Pick-up Card and Welcome Booklet regarding the B.A.A. Boston Marathon and related race week activities will be mailed to you via US Postal Service first class mail. If you do not receive your Number Pick-up Card (required to claim number) and brochure by April 7, please contact our Registration Office at registration@baa.org. Registration related inquiries may also be directed to 508-435-6905.

Note that bib numbers will not be distributed on Race Day. Your travel arrangements should take into account picking up your number at the Seaport World Trade Center in South Boston on Friday, April 13 from 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., or Saturday, April 14 or Sunday, April 15 from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

JetBlue is proud to be the Official Airline of the Boston Marathon! Take $10 off each way with Promo Code RUNBOSTON12. Book your flight to Boston between September 24, 2011 and April 11, 2012 for travel departing April 12-15 and returning 16-18. Promo codes can only be redeemed online at www.jetblue.com/promo.

Get the best hotel rates by using the Official Lodging form from Marathon Tours and Travel. For more information, email info@marathontours.com or call 617-242-7845.

For additional tourist information, please visit www.bostonusa.com

We look forward to seeing you in April! Best of luck in your training!

Sincerely,

Boston Athletic Association











Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com


Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Boston Marathon-Am I in or out?

You can chase a dream
That seems so out of reach
And you know it might not ever come your way
Dream it anyways.

Martina McBride from the song "Anyways"


From the first time I trained for a marathon my goal was to run Boston.  The closest I came to meeting the time standard was my first marathon. I ran it in 4 hours missing the time standard by 10 minutes. As my CMT has progressed, that dream has gotten farther and farther away.

Today my marthon dream became reality. I was informed today by the Boston Athletic Associaton that I was accepted to the Mobility Impaired Division.

I didn't even know there was a Mobility Impaired Division until I was looking at getting the CMTA certified as a charity. The division is meant for those that can't make the time standard due to a medical condition. I had to supply medical diagnois of my CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorder) and prove I could make a 6 hour time standard.

I qualifyed for Boston by running the Madison Marathon last May.I lined up in Madison not knowing if I could still run a marathon. I had once chance to qualify for Boston in 2012. I completed  a hilly course in the rain in 4 hr 52 min. It was an emotional race because I had dedicated it to my mom who had passed away in March.  Boston takes the fastest athletes in all divisions and since I am over an hour under the time standard, I feel I meet the spirit of the best athletes running.

On April, 16, 2012, I will line up with 30,000 other runners and I will be representing Team CMT. I am going to get a medal much like this one placed on my neck. I going to raise a lot of awareness and hopefully some money for CMT research. I am so proud and humbled to be running to raise awareness for everyone battling this disorder, especially those on the team with CMT.

Running Boston is a little goal. I have a bigger one. A cure for CMT. I want to have back what CMT has taken away. I want everyone I know that wears braces because of CMT to know what it is like to walk without them. I want everyone that struggles to do everyday tasks like open jars and button buttons to do them with ease. I know it seems like just another dream thats out of reach. I am going to dream it anyways. Not too long ago Boston seemed out of reach too. There is no end to what you can accomplish with a goal and a dream.


Right now I am so excited.  I can't believe at the end of the month I will start my training. I know I have a tough road ahead, but I can't wait to get started.  As it gets closer, I will have fears and doubts and anxiety because I know how tough marathons are. This will be number 7 and I know it will all be worth it.

Chris Wodke
Founder & Manager Team CMT
www.run4cmt.com

Team CMT is a group of athletes and supporters working to raise awareness and to find a cure for CMT. We have almost 100 members in 17 states. If you wish to join us visit our web site.

CMT or Charcot-Marie-Tooth is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. It affects over 155,000 Americans (as many as MS).  It is a disease of the nerves that control the muscles. It is slowly progressive, causing loss of normal function and or sensation in the lower legs/feet and arms/hands.

Symptoms include; muscle wasting in the lower legs and feet leading to foot drop, poor balance and gait problems Atrophy in the hands causes difficulty with manual dexterity.

Structural foot deformities such as high arches and hammer toes are common.

Poor tolerance for cool or cold temperatures and many people have chronically cold hands and feet.

Additional symptoms may include fatigue, sleep apnea, breathing difficulties and hearing loss.

Running, triathlons, impaired athlete, paratriathlon, USAT, running and CMT